Richard M. Nixon: Politician, President, Administrator

By Leon Friedman; William F. Levantrosser | Go to book overview

1
Capacity for Greatness

ELLIOT L. RICHARDSON

Thank you, Professor Friedman. President Shuart, fellow panelists, ladies, and gentlemen:

It's a great pleasure to be here at this outstanding conference. I would like to begin my remarks by expressing my appreciation for Hofstra's role in conducting the conference. The appreciation is reinforced by Mr. Shuart's observation that this is an objective, academic enterprise. We all have the defects of our qualities, of course, and I would have to acknowledge that indeed it is true that one of my defects or qualities, as the case may be, is objectivity.

It is in that spirit that I have long held and often expressed the view that Richard M. Nixon had it within his grasp to be our greatest post-World War II president. As time goes on, and there are only three White House terms left in this century, that statement looks better all the time. In speaking of Richard Nixon's qualities, I don't quite know whether to use the present or the past tense, certainly with respect to his qualities. He is essentially unchanged from what I can learn. He is a man of remarkable intelligence and great power of intellect, as well as quickness of mind. He has an extremely retentive memory or, in some respects, some might say a long memory. He brought to the presidency a vast amount of experience gained during the years he served as vice president. He was a close student of the actions of the executive branch under President Eisenhower and in the intervening years following his defeat in 1960. He traveled around the world, absorbing more and more information about the relationships between the United States and the rest of the world. He was a man who combined detachment and reserve with a capacity, on occasion, for warmth, which could give way very quickly to manipulation and ruthlessness.

Perhaps the single most important observation to be made about Richard Nixon is that he is a realist. He is a realist whose realism tilts toward cynicism, or, one might say, whose realism is infused with cynicism. This tough-minded outlook is certainly a contributor to the range of his perspective on unfolding

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Richard M. Nixon: Politician, President, Administrator
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 424

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.