Richard M. Nixon: Politician, President, Administrator

By Leon Friedman; William F. Levantrosser | Go to book overview

3
Comparing and Contrasting Ike and Dick

STEPHEN E. AMBROSE

At President Eisenhower's last press conference in January 1961, Robert Spivack asked him if he felt the reporters had been fair to him. "'Well," Ike replied, "when you come down to it, I don't see how a reporter could do much to a president, do you?"

Eisenhower's attitude to the press contrasts so sharply with Nixon's, as expressed so memorably in Nixon's self-proclaimed "last press conference," that it provides a good starting point for comparing and contrasting Eisenhower and Nixon.

Eisenhower downplayed the importance of the press; Nixon exaggerated it. But Ike wooed the press while Nixon went to war with it. These marked differences in thinking and action extended into broader areas and other fields. Eisenhower's tendency, for example, was to calm a crisis, Nixon's to play it up. Ike's instinct was to put salve on a wound after a political dispute, Nixon's to rub in some salt. Eisenhower liked, respected, and worked effectively with the Establishment; Nixon hated and scorned it.

The examples could go on; obviously Eisenhower and Nixon were very different men, hardly surprising, considering how different their backgrounds were--the lifelong soldier and the lifelong politician. When he became president, Eisenhower was sixty-two years old. He had nothing to prove. As commander of Operation Overlord, his great moment was behind him--whatever happened in the next eight years, it could never surpass D-Day. His place in history was assured. It gave him a certain serenity.

When Nixon became president, he was fifty-six years old. He had everything to prove. He had been a candidate all his life, had never administered or commanded anything. His place in history was uncertain. It gave him a certain anxiety.

They had shared problems, one of the chief being the Republican party.

-15-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Richard M. Nixon: Politician, President, Administrator
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 424

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.