Richard M. Nixon: Politician, President, Administrator

By Leon Friedman; William F. Levantrosser | Go to book overview

4
One of Us

TOM WICKER

The genesis of my idea for a book on Richard Nixon was a quick and perplexing encounter with him in a corridor of the Capitol at Washington, nearly thirty years ago. I was reporting from Washington for the Winston-Salem Journal, mostly on the activities of the congressional delegation from North Carolina, and I was also getting a useful first exposure to national politics.

The first of the modern civil rights bills was being debated in 1957, and my coverage of its eventual passage gave me a lasting admiration for the legislative mastery of Lyndon B. Johnson of Texas. Johnson, John F. Kennedy, W. Stuart Symington of Missouri, and Nixon--the presiding officer--were all active in the Senate that year, and maneuvering for their parties' 1960 presidential nominations.

One day, after the Senate session had ended and most congressional reporters had left the Capitol, I worked late in the Senate press gallery--the only "office" I had. When I had finished my story, I went down to the "principal floor," on which the Senate chamber is located, planning to walk across the Capitol to the House side and from there to Independence Avenue for a streetcar downtown.

As I came down the ornate staircase outside the closed Senate chamber, Jack Sherwood, Vice President Nixon's Secret Service agent, passed below me in the silent corridor. Not far behind him was the vice president himself. I had then seen him only distantly from the press gallery, but he was and remains an imminently recognizable man.

I was surprised, first, at seeing him at all because as a rookie in Washington I had supposed officials at so high a level to be afforded general immunity to prying public eyes, and, second, because as far as I could see Nixon was walking alone, except for the Secret Service man preceding him. I had observed that

____________________
Adapted from the book One of Us: Richard Nixon and the American Dream by Tom Wicker, Random House, 1991, ©, by Tom Wicker.

-23-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Richard M. Nixon: Politician, President, Administrator
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 424

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.