Richard M. Nixon: Politician, President, Administrator

By Leon Friedman; William F. Levantrosser | Go to book overview

Discussant: Elliot L. Richardson

Thank you very much for the kind words, ladies and gentlemen. I've been thinking about what kind of contribution I should make to these very important discussions and papers that have been presented to you. Bob Finch was present at the creation of the Family Assistance Plan, as with the launching of other social programs, in the beginning of the Nixon Administration. John Ehrlichman was there during all the important years, in which domestic initiatives were being developed, and can give you insights into President Nixon's thinking on that subject. I would like to have it noted for the record, however, that I always viewed John Ehrlichman as my principal ally and confederate in the White House, contrary to what some people seem to have supposed must be an ideological divide between us. I would have to say--I don't know if this will destroy your reputation, John--but we saw in a very similar way the president's objectives, a role appropriate to the Republican party, and a national response to human needs.

So it seems to me that I could perhaps most usefully comment briefly on these matters, from a pragmatic point of view, which has turned out to be the approach I always have taken in every one of the government jobs, wherever I served. I should add, perhaps, that I had the significant advantage of coming to the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare in May or June of 1970, having served in the department for three years in the Eisenhower Administration. During an interval of two years as lieutenant governor of Massachusetts, I served as sort of a coordinator of all the state's human service programs. This was part of the deal, whereby I agreed to run in the first place. I got the Republican candidate for governor, John Volpe, to agree that if we were both elected, he would delegate to me this responsibility, so I was there at the state level during the course of the Great Society. The result was an approach to these problems, which, as I indicated in my opening remarks this morning, brought to bear the thinking of the president, who was by no means reluctant to involve government where a sufficient case could be made in doing so, but who also believed, and I think these beliefs were perfectly genuine, that the strength and quality of American society, certainly the principle of the Republican party, depended on maximal, feasible reliance on private actions of state and local government.

We had by 1969-70 a history of categorical legislation responding to human needs in a piecemeal kind of way. Health, Education, and Welfare was responsible for the administration of more than 300 categorical programs. Even welfare itself was subdivided into a series of programs dealing separately with the aging, the blind, the disabled, and families with dependent children. All of these welfare programs were separable, and totally distinct in philosophic approach in administration, from the social insurance programs administered by the Social Security Administration. Meanwhile, because the federal government of the United States

-134-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Richard M. Nixon: Politician, President, Administrator
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 424

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.