Multiculturalism and Public Arts Policy

By David B. Pankratz | Go to book overview

3
An Interpretation of Arts Policy Mechanisms

This chapter constitutes an effort to interpret the policies of public arts agencies regarding multiculturalism. It rests on the methodological assumptions of interpretive policy analysis and thus aims to explicate the actions of policy agents and how they understand such actions. This stress on action is intentional. It is consistent with the concept of a policy as a choice to act in accord with a stated imperative whenever specified conditions pertain. Further, such an emphasis counters the view that interpretive policy analysis can lose track of what policy agents actually do in trying to understand their intentions. Thus, this chapter will concentrate on what public arts agencies are doing and plan to do rather than what they say they do or plan to do. Of course, the language used in the documents of arts policy agents is not unimportant. Indeed, the language of arts policy agents is a primary focus of the current and subsequent chapters. But the focus here is on action language, the normative concepts of art, culture, justice, and artistic value by which arts policy agents make sense of or rationalize what they actually do. It is in the next chapter that we will go beyond this necessary first step of explicating arts policy agents' understandings of what they do by clarifying assumptions in contestable value positions as revealed in their usage of normative concepts in policy contexts.


RATIONALE FOR FOCUS ON STATE ARTS AGENCIES

The decision in this book to attend to the actions of public arts agencies regarding multiculturalism begs a question that has not been addressed to this point--namely, What is the significance of decisions by public agencies relative to those made in the private sector as they affect arts organizations of ethnic cultural traditions? The previous chapter cited the shift from marketplace to political decisions as a force in the reemergence of the salience of multiculturalism in American society. But the relationship between public and private decisions in the arts warrants closer scrutiny.

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Multiculturalism and Public Arts Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction: Policy Contexts in the Arts 1
  • Notes 7
  • 1 - Multiculturalism and Arts Policy Research 9
  • Notes 24
  • 2 - Foundations of Policy Research Methodologies 29
  • Notes 48
  • 3 - An Interpretation of Arts Policy Mechanisms 51
  • Notes 110
  • 4 - Conceptual Issues, Multiculturalism, and Arts Policy Mechanisms 119
  • Notes 187
  • 5 - Epilogue: Prospects for Policy Research in the Arts 197
  • Notes 202
  • Bibliography 203
  • Index 221
  • About the Author 233
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