From the Other Side of the Couch: Candid Conversations with Psychiatrists and Psychologists

By Chris E. Stout | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The process of completing this book has been a team effort. I would first like to thank all of the psychiatrists and psychologists who were willing not only to give of their time for the interview, but also to respond so frankly. A common condition with this otherwise heterogeneous sample, is that they are all very busy in their professional pursuits. So to have given such a precious commodity highlights my appreciation. Without such input, this book simply would not have been able to provide such an in-depth examination of the field.

I am also indebted to Paul Pedersen, series editor, and to Mildred Vasan at Greenwood Press.

My parents, Carlos (Jack) and Helen, have always been a support and encouraged my intellectual curiosity and pursuits. My wife, Karen, has patiently put up with my labile moods associated with the headaches and excitement of completing this book.

I am also deeply appreciative of the support and enthusiasm of Forest Hospital and Foundation and its president, Morris B. Squire. I also have relied on Kim Holub, who suffered through the challenging job of transcription and manuscript word processing, along with interviewing assistance. I would also like to recognize Cinde Prusko, Chris Spergel, Olivia Yanez, Pauline Lloyd, Lisa Curry, and Heidi Baltz for their help with organizing interviews and assisting in the interview process, and special thanks to Laura Ptak for completing the index and for her excellent editorial skills.

-ix-

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From the Other Side of the Couch: Candid Conversations with Psychiatrists and Psychologists
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Psychology ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter One - the Training 1
  • Chapter Two - the Practice 13
  • Chapter Three - Chapter Thr 31
  • Chapter Four - the Ethics 73
  • Chapter Five - the Profession 107
  • Chapter Six - the Personal 131
  • Appendix A: The Instrument 159
  • Appendix B: The Sample 163
  • References 167
  • Index 169
  • About the Author 173
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