From the Other Side of the Couch: Candid Conversations with Psychiatrists and Psychologists

By Chris E. Stout | Go to book overview

provided much more data summarization and interpretation, used quantitative analyses for 4,000 subjects over four different disciplines, but they provide no verbatim data from the subjects themselves.

More contemporary works that have used formats similar to this book have been sociologically based examinations of physicians ( Pekkanen, 1988) and law enforcement officials ( Fletcher, 1991). Both of these investigative works relied on topic-specific interviews and then the publication of the categorized verbatim responses of the interviewees. This method provides a markedly experiential perspective of what a group of people's lives are actually like.

There is a broad literature within psychology and psychiatry that deal with a variety of issues, but most of these works are quantitative summaries of survey data and opinion positions. Many researchers ( Drabman, 1985; Nevid, et al, 1986; Peterson, 1985; Rosenweig, 1991; Stout, 1984, 1992b; Stout & Millon, 1987; Tibbits-Kleber & Howell, 1987) have examined training issues, and models. Doctoral-level mental-health professions offer many different models (scientist-practitioner, scientist-scholar, practitioner-scholar; Psy.D., Ph.D., Ed.D., M.D., D.O.; biopsychosocial, clinical, counseling, school, experimental, etc.), and such a variety produces debates on which are "better." While this work surveyed all such models of practice, the data appear quantified only in Appendix B for background and comparative purposes as the more descriptive aspects and actual experiences appear in Chapter 1, "The Training."

Practice development is traditionally discussed as an idealized "how to" ( Adams, 1989; Beach & Goebell, 1988; Callahan & Grace, 1990; Kiesler, 1991; Klein, 1990; Soisson et al., 1987). Again, while these works are worthy of merit, my work describes true-to-life typical days or weeks within a therapist's practice, and actual methods of dealing with the economics of practice, such as setting fees, managing collections, and pro bono services. I have learned that many colleagues, students, and supervisees are quite interested in how others actually "do" practice, not necessarily how others "should" practice.

There are hundreds of articles and books concerning unique, interesting, or unusual cases or treatments ( Cummings & Sorbel, 1985; and works by Haley, desazier, Bandura, Beck, Kemberg). Most of these are published due to the associated fame of the author or uniqueness of the case or treatment. Those herein are less fantastic and more realistic as to what most therapists typically do deal with, and what they actually do.

The more quantitative studies use tabulated data from mailed surveys. While in no way do I dismiss such methods, including the demographic data form, I chose to collect more narrative and descriptive accounts

-xii-

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From the Other Side of the Couch: Candid Conversations with Psychiatrists and Psychologists
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Psychology ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter One - the Training 1
  • Chapter Two - the Practice 13
  • Chapter Three - Chapter Thr 31
  • Chapter Four - the Ethics 73
  • Chapter Five - the Profession 107
  • Chapter Six - the Personal 131
  • Appendix A: The Instrument 159
  • Appendix B: The Sample 163
  • References 167
  • Index 169
  • About the Author 173
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