Modern Perspectives on B. F. Skinner and Contemporary Behaviorism

By James T. Todd; Edward K. Morris | Go to book overview

Appendix
An Updated Bibliography of B. F. Skinner's Works

Robert Epstein

At a professional meeting a few years ago, I gave a talk about my penchant for collecting and cataloging "Skinneria," called, "Running Just to Keep in the Same Place." Like the Red Queen in Alice in Wonderland, I had to run fast just to stay still because Skinner produced new works of all sorts at a high rate. Alas, now that he has died (in August 1990), I may finally catch up. I will miss the exercise dearly.

This is the third bibliography of Skinner's works I have published, and yet another has been in preparation for over a decade: Terry Knapp and I will soon complete a book entitled B. F. Skinner: An Annotated Guide to Primary and Secondary References.

Listed here are Skinner's major published papers and books. Many have been reprinted, sometimes under different titles. Without exception, I have listed only the first version of the work and omitted a great many lesser publications--abstracts, book reviews, prefaces and forewords, short comments, and letters to editors, for example--many of which are notable and all of which will be included in the Annotated Guide. Skinner's words are also preserved in films, audiotapes and videotapes, and scores of published interviews. Thousands of pages of unpublished writings remain for the historians--personal notes, correspondence, unpublished manuscripts, classroom materials, memoranda to colleagues, grant proposals and progress reports, patent materials, construction manuals, and even a script for a television show that was never produced. The Harvard archives currently holds more than 27 cubic feet of such materials in eighty-two boxes, and that is just the beginning.

I am grateful to Julie S. Vargas, Skinner's daughter and director of the B. F. Skinner Foundation, for allowing me to access to Foundation materials to complete this listing.

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