Historical Dictionary of the Spanish American War

By Donald H. Dyal; Brian B. Carpenter et al. | Go to book overview

F

FAJARDO, PUERTO RICO

Fajardo was the original destination of General Nelson Miles's* expeditionary force. However, en route Miles received intelligence that the Spanish expected his landing at Fajardo, so he landed at Guánica* instead. Word of this change did not reach Generals James H. Wilson* and Theodore Schwan* until 26 July 1898. Wilson and his transports then steamed to Guánica.

Fajardo is about 30 miles east of San Juan* in the northeast of the island.


FIFTH ARMY CORPS, U.S.

As the U.S. Army prepared and then developed plans during the war, eight corps were created in the first weeks of May 1898. Fifth Corps, with headquarters at Tampa,* was charged specifically with preparing for the invasion of Cuba. For this reason, it was composed largely of regulars. General William R. Shafter* commanded, and his mission, which he received in a series of orders given the last week in May, was to capture or destroy the Spanish garrison at Santiago* and aid in the defeat of Admiral Pascual Cervera's* squadron. The orders arrived only hours before departure, resulting in such confusion that much-needed equipment remained on the docks.

Composed of infantry regulars plus volunteer units like the Rough Riders,* Fifth Corps troops were all generally well trained and well led. Nevertheless, none had ever participated in such a large-scale effort. Mistakes were made, but the troops learned quickly. Thirty-one transports, most small, conveyed the expeditionary force to Cuban waters with naval escort. Landing with no Spanish resistance at Siboney* and Daiquirí,* the Fifth Corps fought successively and successfully at Las Guásimas,* El Caney,* San Juan Hill,* and Aguadores and engaged in sundry smaller actions in the environs of Santiago.

Equipment shortages* and supply shortages created self-imposed hardships. Much of the difficulty lay in inadequate transport. Rations, stoves, tentage, and

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Historical Dictionary of the Spanish American War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Chronology of the Spanish American War xi
  • A 1
  • B 31
  • C 53
  • D 98
  • E 116
  • F 126
  • G 136
  • H 150
  • I 165
  • J 174
  • K 176
  • L 183
  • M 194
  • N 231
  • O 242
  • P 252
  • Q 272
  • R 273
  • S 286
  • T 316
  • U 331
  • V 334
  • W 341
  • Y 355
  • Z 360
  • Bibliographical Essay 363
  • Index 365
  • About the Editor and Contributors 377
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