Historical Dictionary of the Spanish American War

By Donald H. Dyal; Brian B. Carpenter et al. | Go to book overview

I

IMMUNES

Volunteer infantry regiments were created in the first two weeks of May 1898 to supplement and expand the regular army. Among these volunteer regiments were four regiments of "immunes" composed largely of blacks from the South. It was erroneously believed that African Americans were immune to yellow fever* and other tropical diseases, hence the name. The units were commanded by regular officers and were the Seventh, Eighth, Ninth, and Tenth U.S. Volunteer Infantry. One of these units, the Ninth, was ordered to Santiago de Cuba,* but not to fight. Like most of their white counterparts, the volunteer units had little opportunity to see action. Instead they performed garrison duty in order for nonimmune units to be moved out to hospitals, for example.

REFERENCES: Graham A. Cosmas, An Army for Empire ( Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1971), Bernard C. Nalty, Strength for the Fight: A History of Black Americans in the Military ( New York: Free Press, 1986).


INDEPENDENCE

In Cuba, Puerto Rico,* and the Philippines* there existed desires and movements for self-determination antedating the Spanish American War. The Cuban movement for independence had a long history. Woven into that history was sympathy from the United States, which manifested itself in numerous attempts at filibustering.* The Cuban Insurrection of 1895* utilized U.S. soil as a staging ground for fundraising and for political and diplomatic support on issues such as autonomy* and belligerency.* The Cuban junta,* Cuban Revolutionary Army,* and the Cuban Insurrection first grew supportive and fiscal roots in the United States and then moved to the island. One of the advantages the Cubans possessed over the Filipinos and Puerto Ricans was that U.S. objectives in Cuba were clearly defined and well articulated. They had been rehearsed in Congress* and in the press (see The Press and the War*) and had a well-developed doc-

-165-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Historical Dictionary of the Spanish American War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Chronology of the Spanish American War xi
  • A 1
  • B 31
  • C 53
  • D 98
  • E 116
  • F 126
  • G 136
  • H 150
  • I 165
  • J 174
  • K 176
  • L 183
  • M 194
  • N 231
  • O 242
  • P 252
  • Q 272
  • R 273
  • S 286
  • T 316
  • U 331
  • V 334
  • W 341
  • Y 355
  • Z 360
  • Bibliographical Essay 363
  • Index 365
  • About the Editor and Contributors 377
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 380

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.