Historical Dictionary of the Spanish American War

By Donald H. Dyal; Brian B. Carpenter et al. | Go to book overview

J

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

Jacksonville served as an overflow camp for Fifth Corps.* General William R. Shafter* opened Jacksonville as an additional camp when Tampa* became too crowded. Major General Fitzhugh Lee* took command of Seventh Corps at Camp Cuba Libre* near Jacksonville, and it became one of the better-run camps of the war. Seventh Corps was to attack Havana,* but it never left Florida.

REFERENCE: Correspondence Relating to the War with Spain, 2 vols. ( Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1902).


JAPAN

Like Great Britain* and Germany,* Japan played an important secondary role in the Spanish American War's Pacific theater. There was considerable tension in Washington and in Tokyo over Japanese immigration to Hawaii* and California. In March 1897 the Hawaiian government refused admittance to a boatload of Japanese. Sabers rattled as Japanese pronouncements increased in volume. The American navy prepared a war plan against Japan and at the same time increased its presence in Hawaii. John W. Foster, former secretary of state, drafted an annexation treaty that President William McKinley* received before the end of May. The impulse to annex Hawaii came from a desire to beat Japan at is own game. That the islands were not in fact annexed until the height of the Spanish American War reveals the additional strategic value of the islands as the Pacific conflict developed.

With growing nationalism and developing militarism, Japan also viewed events in the Philippines with more than casual interest. Not quite the spoiler that Germany tried to be, Japan made it plain that a native government at Manila* would be unacceptable. The restoration of Spanish rule could not succeed. If the United States withdrew from the Philippines, those islands would face

-174-

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Historical Dictionary of the Spanish American War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Chronology of the Spanish American War xi
  • A 1
  • B 31
  • C 53
  • D 98
  • E 116
  • F 126
  • G 136
  • H 150
  • I 165
  • J 174
  • K 176
  • L 183
  • M 194
  • N 231
  • O 242
  • P 252
  • Q 272
  • R 273
  • S 286
  • T 316
  • U 331
  • V 334
  • W 341
  • Y 355
  • Z 360
  • Bibliographical Essay 363
  • Index 365
  • About the Editor and Contributors 377
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