Historical Dictionary of the Spanish American War

By Donald H. Dyal; Brian B. Carpenter et al. | Go to book overview

L

LAKELAND, FLORIDA

As the Fifth Corps* of the U.S. Army swelled in numbers during May 1898, additional camps were used to relieve congestion at Tampa.* One of these was at Lakeland, Florida; another was at Jacksonville.* Lakeland was the scene of some minor and not so minor racial incidents. The camp was vacated when the expeditionary force sailed for Cuba in June.


LANDING CRAFT

Despite the experience of the U.S. Marines and the U.S. Navy in occasional amphibious training operations before the Spanish American War, the services were caught wholly unprepared for the logistical demands of the army in its expedition to Cuba. Transports were in short supply and had to be commandeered. Many of these ships were without adequate ventilation, storage, or quarters. Landing craft per se were still a dream of the future. Lifeboats, naval launches, tugs, barges, and steam lighters were pressed into duty to ferry troops, provisions, munitions, and transport through the surf to the shore. Chaos was the result, and it speaks well for the initiative of the commanders that the landing was successful at all.

The Eighth Corps* in the Philippines used lifeboats and steam launches also. These were supplemented by native craft pressed into onerous duty to transport troops ashore. By the very nature of such transport, numerous accidents occurred, causing loss of life and casualties.

REFERENCE: Graham A. Cosmas, An Army for Empire ( Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1971).


LAWTON, HENRY WARE (1843-1899)

Henry Ware Lawton left his Ohio birthplace at a tender age and grew up in Indiana. Enlisting in the Civil War in 1861, he was commissioned first lieuten-

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Historical Dictionary of the Spanish American War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Chronology of the Spanish American War xi
  • A 1
  • B 31
  • C 53
  • D 98
  • E 116
  • F 126
  • G 136
  • H 150
  • I 165
  • J 174
  • K 176
  • L 183
  • M 194
  • N 231
  • O 242
  • P 252
  • Q 272
  • R 273
  • S 286
  • T 316
  • U 331
  • V 334
  • W 341
  • Y 355
  • Z 360
  • Bibliographical Essay 363
  • Index 365
  • About the Editor and Contributors 377
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