Historical Dictionary of the Spanish American War

By Donald H. Dyal; Brian B. Carpenter et al. | Go to book overview

N

NANSHAN (ship)

Nanshan was a ship of 5,059 tons launched in 1896 at Grangemouth, Scotland, for use as a collier in the Far East. Purchased on 6 April 1898 at Hong Kong* for use with Commodore George Dewey's* Asiatic Squadron,*Nanshan sailed with the squadron on 24 April and coaled Dewey's ships until Manila* was occupied on 13 August. She carried one 6-pounder and served in the Pacific most of her naval career until sold in 1922.

REFERENCE: Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships ( Washington, DC: Navy Department, 1979).


NASHVILLE (ship)

The U.S.S. Nashville was a 1,371-ton gunboat commissioned on 19 August 1897. Nashville's armament consisted of eight 4-inch guns, four 6-pounders, and some smaller-caliber weapons. Nashville also carried good rate of speed: 16 knots. She was initially attached to Admiral William T. Sampson's* blockade* of Cuba and distinguished herself by capturing the Spanish steamers Buena Ventura and Pedro on 21 April 1898 and, on the twenty-ninth, the Argonauta off Cienfuegos.*

On 11 May Nashville, cruiser Marblehead,* and cutter Windom tried to cut telegraph cables from Cienfuegos to Santiago.*Nashville provided supporting and suppressing fires while sailors in launches attempted to sever the cables. Spanish fire from the beach was accurate and plentiful, and only two of the five cables were cut. Nashville maintained a blockade of Cienfuegos, awaiting the possible arrival of Admiral Pascual Cervera's* fleet from Curaçao. Nashville and Marblehead were reinforced by the Castine* when it was thought Cervera was going to Cienfuegos.

On 26 July Nashville occupied Gibara on the northern coast of Cuba.

-231-

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Historical Dictionary of the Spanish American War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Chronology of the Spanish American War xi
  • A 1
  • B 31
  • C 53
  • D 98
  • E 116
  • F 126
  • G 136
  • H 150
  • I 165
  • J 174
  • K 176
  • L 183
  • M 194
  • N 231
  • O 242
  • P 252
  • Q 272
  • R 273
  • S 286
  • T 316
  • U 331
  • V 334
  • W 341
  • Y 355
  • Z 360
  • Bibliographical Essay 363
  • Index 365
  • About the Editor and Contributors 377
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