Historical Dictionary of the Spanish American War

By Donald H. Dyal; Brian B. Carpenter et al. | Go to book overview

Bibliographical Essay

Any bibliographical discussion of the Spanish American War should begin with extant bibliographical efforts. For the war with Spain there are few. The principal works are Thomas E. Kelly III, U.S. Army and the Spanish-American War Era, 1895-1910 ( 1974) and Anne Cipriano Venzon, The Spanish-American War. An Annotated Bibliography ( 1990). By skimming through both, a rough overview of the primary and secondary sources on the war comes into focus. The Kelly bibliography, done at Carlisle Barracks, understandably emphasizes the U.S. Army's participation. Although more than two decades old, it is still very useful. The Venzon bibliography is much more recent, broader in treatment (there are sections on biography, army, navy, the press, medicine, ethnic treatments, fiction, music, and more) but less comprehensive. Since it is selective, the Venzon bibliography has some built-in limitations. Nevertheless, Venzon's annotations can provide important signposts for the Spanish American War novice. The chief shortcoming of both the Kelly and Venzon bibliographies is that they are almost wholly oriented to the U.S. sources and points of view.

Much of the grist and grunt of historical research on the war lies in contemporary government publications and contemporary summaries of these government-issued reports. The secretaries of the navy and the army both issued an Annual Report for 1898 that contains a wealth of detail. In addition, the Annual Report of the War Department ( 1898), the Navy Department ( 1898), the two-volume Adjutant General's Office Correspondence Relating to the War with Spain . . . ( 1902), the U.S. Senate's Report of the Commission Appointed by the President to Investigate the Conduct of the War Department in the War with Spain ( 1900), and the Appendix to the Report of the Chief of the Bureau of Navigation ( 1898) could all be read with profit.

Official Spanish government reports are equally valuable, but scarce in this country. Fortunately, many of these were translated and then published by the U.S. government, thus affording significantly greater access. Among these are Spanish Diplomatic Correspondence and Documents, 1896-1900, Presented to the Cortes by the Minister of State ( 1905); Admiral Pascual Cervera y Topete, The Spanish-American War: A Collection of Documents Relative to the Squadron Operations in the West Indies ( 1899); and Víctor M. Concas y Palau , The Squadron of Admiral Cervera ( 1900). The last-named title might

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Historical Dictionary of the Spanish American War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Chronology of the Spanish American War xi
  • A 1
  • B 31
  • C 53
  • D 98
  • E 116
  • F 126
  • G 136
  • H 150
  • I 165
  • J 174
  • K 176
  • L 183
  • M 194
  • N 231
  • O 242
  • P 252
  • Q 272
  • R 273
  • S 286
  • T 316
  • U 331
  • V 334
  • W 341
  • Y 355
  • Z 360
  • Bibliographical Essay 363
  • Index 365
  • About the Editor and Contributors 377
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