Liberalism and Social Reform: Industrial Growth and Progressiste Politics in France, 1880-1914

By David M. Gordon | Go to book overview

1
Industrial Growth and Socialist Success at Roubaix

Jules Guesde and his supporters had their first great success in the 1892 municipal elections. The Parti ouvrier français captured a number of city governments and received over 60,000 votes nationally. Nowhere was its victory more impressive than at Roubaix, a grim textile manufacturing town in the Nord, where Guesdists easily defeated their conservative rivals and captured all thirty- six seats on the city council. 1 Flushed with success, Guesde had rapturously dubbed the city the "ville sainte de socialisme," declaring it a model for industrial towns throughout France. 2 Only months earlier, he had written that the Parti ouvrier should remain ready at the appropriate hour to "join the power of the ballot with that of the gun." He was now willing to believe that voting could also bring revolutionary change, and POF leaders who had questioned the importance of elections began to define the legal conquest of power as a revolutionary (and, hence, legitimate) task. 3 Guesde's election to the Chamber of Deputies at Roubaix the following year further convinced him of the POF's bright future. (He was elected in the district of Roubaix-Est, Roubaix-Nord, and the industrial suburb of Wattrelos.)

Guesde's conviction was shared by Socialists throughout Europe, and congratulatory telegrams were received from the Socialist parties of Poland, Romania, and Austria. The Bulgarians cabled, "From the shores of the Black Sea we cry: Long live victorious working class France." 4 However, within a decade, the POF had lost its majority and its hold over Roubaix seemed broken. Eugène Motte, the city's wealthiest manufacturer, defeated Guesde in 1898, captured the municipal government in 1902, and inaugurated a decade of liberal rule. 5 This sudden and dramatic reversal was not easily accomplished. The Socialist victories that had preceded Motte's success had come as the result of the slow decline of parties that were friendly to capitalism. The evolution of Roubaix's political life had also been closely related to economic conditions. Prosperity in the 1860s at first had strengthened the political domination of wealthy manufacturers, but both the Conservatives and Opportunists became victims of the city's economic

-31-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Liberalism and Social Reform: Industrial Growth and Progressiste Politics in France, 1880-1914
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 27
  • 1 - Industrial Growth and Socialist Success at Roubaix 31
  • Notes 50
  • 2 - Eugène Motte and the Bourgeois Political Resurgence 55
  • Notes 78
  • 3 - Georges Claudinon and the Industrial Revival at Le Chambon-Feugerolles 83
  • Notes 109
  • 4 - Industrial Crisis and Progressiste Success at Rive-De-Gier 115
  • Notes 135
  • 5 - François De Wendel and Progressiste Politics in Industrial Lorraine 141
  • Notes 164
  • Conclusion 171
  • Notes 191
  • Appendix 195
  • Bibliography 209
  • Index 217
  • About the Author 227
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 232

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.