Liberalism and Social Reform: Industrial Growth and Progressiste Politics in France, 1880-1914

By David M. Gordon | Go to book overview

Socialist warhorse, remained the candidate that divided the Fédération least. Vinay, who had wanted the nomination, was disappointed enough to run as an independent républicain-socialiste supporter of Briand. Like the former prime minister, this old-time union militant was ready to abandon socialism for political office, realizing that only through an accommodation with moderate political opinion could he be elected.

Blaise Neyret, the candidate of Progressistes, libéraux, and moderate republicans, was the leader of the Association patronal des droguistes de St. Etienne, the local druggists' organization. 93 The Tribune called him the organizer of the local drug trust, but he preferred to describe himself as a competent municipal administrator who had made a reputation as St. Etienne's director of public assistance. 94 He was greatly helped by the divisions on the Left. Like Arbel, he rejected epithets like "reactionary" and "clerical," which he said were a substitute for arguments. Like Arbel, too, he supported freedom of education and the three-year army law, which he claimed was the best insurance against war. He also benefited from a renewed period of political apathy and indifference among metalworkers that followed the latest series of failed strikes." 95

Neyret received 46 percent of the vote on the first ballot. Charpentier got 23 percent, Vinay 17 percent, the Guesdist candidate 8 percent, and a Radical 6 percent. Charpentier received the most votes in every industrial town except Rive-de-Gier. 96 Neyret received hardly more than a third of the vote in the two largest industrial towns in the department and rather less than that at Grand Croix; these totals were well below those achieved by Arbel in 1910. 97

With Charpentier his only opponent on the second ballot, Neyret won the election with 51 percent of the vote. Charpentier, despite the elimination of the Radical and the Guesdist, got only 49 percent. However, the combined Socialist- Radical vote had been 54 percent in the first tour. Charpentier was able to win majorities in the industrial centers. However, the most striking development in the second round was the flight of so many voters from the Socialist to the Progressiste camp. Neyret's share increased by 11 percent at Rive-de-Gier (from 36 to 47 percent), by 6 percent at Lorette (from 36 to 42 percent), and by 9 percent at Grand Croix (from 22 to 31 percent). 98 The bitterness and divisions on the Left, which had been exacerbated by previous Progressiste victories and Briand's abandonment of socialism, thus continued on the eve of the war to shape elections to the profit of republican capitalist politicians. This was equally true in the Meurthe-et-Moselle, France's newest and most dynamic center of heavy industry. There, François de Wendel, a new Progressiste leader, helped moderate, not only the politics of the Left, but also a powerful, and occasionally anti-republican, nationalist movement in Lorraine.


NOTES
1.
Antoine Jean Arbel was born at Tartaras in the Loire in 1855. Elected to the Chamber of Deputies in 1910, he served as a member of the Commission de la marine.

-135-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Liberalism and Social Reform: Industrial Growth and Progressiste Politics in France, 1880-1914
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 27
  • 1 - Industrial Growth and Socialist Success at Roubaix 31
  • Notes 50
  • 2 - Eugène Motte and the Bourgeois Political Resurgence 55
  • Notes 78
  • 3 - Georges Claudinon and the Industrial Revival at Le Chambon-Feugerolles 83
  • Notes 109
  • 4 - Industrial Crisis and Progressiste Success at Rive-De-Gier 115
  • Notes 135
  • 5 - François De Wendel and Progressiste Politics in Industrial Lorraine 141
  • Notes 164
  • Conclusion 171
  • Notes 191
  • Appendix 195
  • Bibliography 209
  • Index 217
  • About the Author 227
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 232

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.