Playing the Game: The Presidential Rhetoric of Ronald Reagan

By Mary E. Stuckey | Go to book overview

gan presidency, and is a key factor in both the building and the destruction of the teflon presidency.


CONCLUSIONS

This period is characterized by a mixture of political and rhetorical successes and failures. Ronald Reagan ran on a platform of saving the American economy and "bringing America back." Faced with the frustration and difficulties involved in achieving the former, he increasingly turned toward the latter.

Reagan got his budget cuts and also created a recession that made serious inroads into his standing at the polls. He was seen as a political genius on the one hand, and a "rich man's president" on the other. But whatever else can be said about Ronald Reagan, he is neither a stupid nor an unperceptive man. On the contrary, he is a man who has proved himself able to learn and adapt. During this period, Reagan was both learning and adapting. The fruits of this process can be seen in his middle years as president.


NOTES
1.
George C. Edwards III, The Public Presidency: The Pursuit of Popular Support ( New York: St. Martin's Press, 1983), p. 24.
2.
John Orman, "Reagan's Imperial Presidency," (Paper delivered at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, Chicago, Ill., August 1987).
3.
Lou Cannon, Reagan ( New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1982), p. 381.
4.
Lawrence Barrett, Gambling With History ( New York: Penguin Books, 1984), p. 442.
5.
Lester M. Salamon, "The Presidency and Domestic Policy Formation," in The Illusion of Presidential Government, eds. Hugh Heclo and Lester M. Salamon ( Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1981), p. 199.
6.
Thomas P. O'Neill with William Novak, Man of the House: The Life and Political Memoirs of Speaker Tip O'Neill ( New York: Random House, 1987), p. 344.
7.
O'Neill with Novak, Man of the House, p. 341.

-41-

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Playing the Game: The Presidential Rhetoric of Ronald Reagan
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • PRAEGER SERIES IN POLITICAL COMMUNICATION ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Series Foreword xi
  • Notes xiii
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 6
  • Chapter 1 Ronald Reagan and the National Media 9
  • Introduction 9
  • Notes 22
  • Notes 23
  • Chapter 2 Revolution: Reagan's First Years, 1981-1982 27
  • CONCLUSIONS 41
  • Notes 41
  • Chapter 3 Consolidation: the Teflon President, 1983-1985 47
  • Introduction 47
  • CONCLUSIONS 61
  • Notes 62
  • Chapter 4 Cracks in the Teflon, 1986-1988 67
  • Introduction 67
  • CONCLUSIONS 80
  • Notes 81
  • Chapter 5 the Great Communicator? 85
  • Introduction 85
  • Notes 93
  • Epilogue: Rhetoric in the Post-Reagan Era 95
  • INTRODUCRION 95
  • Notes 114
  • Notes 115
  • Selected Bibliography 119
  • Index 125
  • About the Author 128
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