Playing the Game: The Presidential Rhetoric of Ronald Reagan

By Mary E. Stuckey | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
All of the documents from this period come from the Weekly Compilation of the Public Papers of the President (hereafter cited as Public Papers). They are cited by date and title. The first 20 days of 1989 are also included in the data; there are 14 documents for the last three weeks of the Reagan presidency, and they are counted as part of 1988.
2.
Michael Baruch Grossman and Martha Joynt Kumar, "The Limits of Persuasion: Political Communications in the Reagan and Carter Administrations" (Paper delivered at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, Chicago, Ill., August 1987), p. 11.
3.
Grossman and Kumar, "Limits of Persuasion," p. 12.
4.
Bert A. Rockman, "The Style and Organization of the Reagan Presidency," in The Reagan Legacy: Promise and Performance, ed. Charles O. Jones (Chatham, N.J.: Chatham House, 1988), p. 26.
5.
Rockman, "Style and Organization," p. 19.
6.
Thomas C. Griscom, "Presidential Communication: An Essential Leadership Tool," in The Presidency in Transition, eds. James P. Pfiffner and R. Gordon Hoxie ( New York: The Center for the Study of the Presidency, 1989), p. 340.
7.
Nancy Elizabeth Fitch, "The Management Style of Ronald Reagan: Chairman of the Board of the United States of America--Annotated Bibliography" (Monticello, Ill.: Vance Bibliographies, 1982), p. 2.
8.
Bill Boyarsky, Ronald Reagan: His Life and Rise to the Presidency ( New York: Random House, 1981), p. 11.
9.
"Remarks at a White House Briefing for a Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations," Public Papers, March 5, 1986, Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office; "Remarks at a White House Briefing for Associated General Contractors of America," Public Papers, April 14, 1986.
10.
"Remarks at a White House Briefing for Private Sector Supporters of Contra Aid," Public Papers, March 14, 1986; "Radio Address to the Nation on Contra Aid," Public Papers, March 22, 1986; "Address to the Nation on Aid for the Nicaraguan Democratic Resistance," Public Papers, June 24, 1986.
11.
Reagan used this tactic 23 times during the period. See "Radio Address to the Nation on National Security," Public Papers, May 1, 1986; "Remarks at the Annual Dinner for Strategic International Studies," Public Papers, June 9, 1986; "Address Before a Permanent Council of the Organization of American States," Public Papers, October 7, 1987.

-81-

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Playing the Game: The Presidential Rhetoric of Ronald Reagan
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • PRAEGER SERIES IN POLITICAL COMMUNICATION ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Series Foreword xi
  • Notes xiii
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 6
  • Chapter 1 Ronald Reagan and the National Media 9
  • Introduction 9
  • Notes 22
  • Notes 23
  • Chapter 2 Revolution: Reagan's First Years, 1981-1982 27
  • CONCLUSIONS 41
  • Notes 41
  • Chapter 3 Consolidation: the Teflon President, 1983-1985 47
  • Introduction 47
  • CONCLUSIONS 61
  • Notes 62
  • Chapter 4 Cracks in the Teflon, 1986-1988 67
  • Introduction 67
  • CONCLUSIONS 80
  • Notes 81
  • Chapter 5 the Great Communicator? 85
  • Introduction 85
  • Notes 93
  • Epilogue: Rhetoric in the Post-Reagan Era 95
  • INTRODUCRION 95
  • Notes 114
  • Notes 115
  • Selected Bibliography 119
  • Index 125
  • About the Author 128
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