U.S. Energy and Environmental Interest Groups: Institutional Profiles

By Lettie McSpadden Wenner | Go to book overview

C

CARRYING CAPACITY

1325 G Street, N.W., Suite 1003 Washington, D.C. 20005


ORGANIZATION AND RESOURCES

Carrying Capacity was founded in 1981, dedicated to the proposition that the United States needs to develop a sustainable economy. By the late 1980s it had about 800 members, paying dues of $15 a year. Its budget of $75,000 is derived mostly from individual contributions. Carrying Capacity has a board of 3 people who select their successors. Dr. Edward Passerini is president; and the executive administrator, Linda Kovan, is its only paid staff in Washington.


POLICY CONCERNS

The board of directors of Carrying Capacity concentrates on doing research on natural resources in the United States and publishing this information for the education of its members and the public in general. In 1986 it published a summary report of Beyond Oil: The Threat to Food and Fuel in the Coming Decades, a study written by researchers at the Complex Systems Research Center at the University of New Hampshire. That report emphasized the dependence of the United States economy, including agriculture, on a diminishing petroleum supply. It advocates that population be brought under control and balanced against natural resources; that conservation, cogeneration, and renewable energy resources replace dependence on finite fossil fuels; and that agriculture emphasize organic sustainable farming with less dependence on insecticides and fertilizers.

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