U.S. Energy and Environmental Interest Groups: Institutional Profiles

By Lettie McSpadden Wenner | Go to book overview

D

DEFENDERS OF FURBEARERS

See Defenders of Wildlife.


DEFENDERS OF WILDLIFE

1244 19th Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20035


HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT

The Defenders of Furbearers was founded in 1947 by seven naturalists, including Lloyd Symmington, in order to raise public consciousness about the suffering of animals killed for their pelts. In 1959, it was renamed the Defenders of Wildlife and expanded its goals to preserve, enhance, and protect the natural abundance and diversity of wildlife including the integrity of natural wildlife ecosystems for all species. Its most important success was the passage of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 1973, although it also considers the Land and Water Conservation Fund ( 1964), Wildlife Refuge ( 1966), Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries ( 1972), and Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation (1980) Acts as major landmarks in its fight to prevent humankind from intentionally or inadvertently eradicating other species from the earth.

Joyce M. Kelly became president of the Defenders of Wildlife in May 1986 after serving as the head of the wilderness program in the U.S. Department of Interior's Bureau of Land Management (BLM). During her tenure in BLM, she resisted the asserted plan of its director, Robert Burford, for increasing the amount of wilderness area open to mining and mineral exploration, timber harvesting, and cattle grazing. For her efforts, she won the 1985 Mid-Atlantic regional Stephen T. Mather award presented by the National Parks and Conservation

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