U.S. Energy and Environmental Interest Groups: Institutional Profiles

By Lettie McSpadden Wenner | Go to book overview

M

MANUFACTURERS OF EMISSION CONTROLS ASSOCIATION (MECA)

1707 L Street, N.W., Suite 570 Washington, D.C. 20036


ORGANIZATION AND RESOURCES

The Manufacturers of Emission Controls Association (MECA) is a trade association formed in 1976 to assist the new industry specializing in manufacturing catalytic converters and other emission control devices for the automotive industry. It now has eighteen corporate members, including Allied Signal Automotive Catalyst Company, Coming Glass Works, the 3M Company, Midas International, and Walker Manufacturing. Many of these companies have expanded into the business of providing air pollution controls for stationary sources as well as motor vehicles. It charges $3,500 for dues and produces an annual budget of about $60,000. It has three professional staff people in Washington, headed by Executive Director Bruce 1. Bertelsen.


POLICY CONCERNS

MECA was an unintended consequence of the Clean Air Act (CAA), one of the environmental initiatives undertaken by the U.S. government in the 1970s. By mandating a percentage reduction of hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxide emissions from cars, Congress provided an incentive for entreprenuers and established companies to devote resources to finding a method for reducing those substances. Motor vehicle manufacturers met the initial, rather low, standards by simply adjusting engines to perform less efficiently. However, in a few years the catalytic converter was developed as an add-on device for

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