U.S. Energy and Environmental Interest Groups: Institutional Profiles

By Lettie McSpadden Wenner | Go to book overview

N

NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS ASSOCIATION (NACA) 1155 15th Street, N.W., Suite 900 Washington, D.C. 20005

ORGANIZATION AND RESOURCES

The National Agricultural Chemicals Association (NACA) was founded in 1933 to represent the interests of the fourteen founding member corporations, all of which manufactured agricultural chemicals, such as fertilizers, insecticides, and fungicides. Its interests centered around developing markets for its members' products until the 1960s when some biologists such as Rachel Carson began to document the dangers of chemical contamination of the environment.

Congress passed the original Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) in 1947 which authorized the Department of Agriculture to register commercial poisons for use in the agricultural industry, but this law had little impact on the development and marketing of new agricultural chemicals until after the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) took over administration of the law in 1970 and Congress made substantial changes to it in the 1970s. During the 1970s NACA took on a defensive role for the industry in addition to its promotional role.

By the end of the 1980s NACA had increased its corporate membership to eighty-nine, including such giants of the chemical industry as Abbott Labs, American Cyanamid, BASF, Du Pont, Dow, FMC, NOR-AM, Velsicol, and Union Carbide. These same corporations also maintain membership in such other trade associations as the Chemical Manufacturers* and Chemical Specialty Manufacturers.* It has a board of directors of thirty-two major corporate executives. Dr. Jack D. Early has been president of NACA since 1976 and heads a staff of

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