U.S. Energy and Environmental Interest Groups: Institutional Profiles

By Lettie McSpadden Wenner | Go to book overview

P

PENNSYLVANIA WATERWORKS ASSOCIATION

See National Association of Water Companies.


THE PETROCHEMICAL ENERGY GROUP (PEG)

1100 15th Street, N.W., Suite 1200 Washington, D.C. 20005


ORGANIZATION AND RESOURCES

The Petrochemical Energy Group (PEG) was founded in 1972 by seven companies that all use gas and oil as the feedstock for their products. PEG has nine members and a seven-person board of directors. Dena E. Wiggins is its administrator in Washington. It has a small budget and hires professional lobbyists to represent its interests.


POLICY CONCERNS

PEG's interests do not diverge substantially from those of the large trade associations representing the chemical, petroleum, and plastics industries. It opposes all controls on the price of natural gas because it believes if the price is allowed to float free it will come down. It believes that regulation can only favor the producers and distributors.

PEG also opposed the renewal of the Superfund Act in 1986. It believes that the tax on the petrochemical industry is unfair and keeps the costs of oil abnormally high. It did succeed in convincing Congress to add an industry-wide tax to Superfund. Like other trade associations, PEG opposes any victim compensation clause in the law on the grounds that it would be too expensive for industry to fund.

It opposes any import tax on foreign oil on the grounds this will increase

-256-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
U.S. Energy and Environmental Interest Groups: Institutional Profiles
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 364

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.