U.S. Energy and Environmental Interest Groups: Institutional Profiles

By Lettie McSpadden Wenner | Go to book overview

R

RACHEL CARSON COUNCIL

8940 Jones Mill Road
Chevy Chase, Maryland 20815


ORGANIZATION AND RESOURCES

In December 1965, a little over a year after the death of Rachel Carson, friends and colleagues of the well-known publicist and author of Silent Spring formed the Rachel Carson Trust for the Living Environment, which later changed its name to the Rachel Carson Council. It was dedicated to advancing Ms. Carson's philosophy of conserving the natural environment and reducing dependence on chemical pesticides. Its president is Dr. Samuel S. Epstein, a toxicologist on the staff of the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health. Its executive director is Shirley A. Briggs, who has served in this capacity since the creation of the council, and heads a staff of four. There is an eighteen-person board of directors and a six-person advisory committee to make policy for the Council. The Council charges $15 a year for individuals to become associates.


POLICY CONCERNS

The Council responds to individual requests for information about the impact of toxic chemicals on the environment and human health and seeks to inform the public through publications about the hazards of pesticides. Representatives have testified before Congress about the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). It argued for years against the practice of paying manufacturers for disposal of stocks of chemicals declared unsafe for use by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which was accomplished by the 1989 amendments to FIFRA.

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