U.S. Energy and Environmental Interest Groups: Institutional Profiles

By Lettie McSpadden Wenner | Go to book overview

S

SAFE ENERGY COMMUNICATION COUNCIL (SECC)

1717 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite LL215 Washington, D.C. 20036


ORGANIZATION AND RESOURCES

The Safe Energy Communication Council (SECC) was founded in 1980 to counter advertisements by the nuclear power industry, specifically the U.S. Council for Energy Awareness (USCEA).* The SECC has a budget of about $100,000 a year obtained from about fifteen environmental groups such as the Sierra Club,* who are also represented on SECC's board of directors. It has no members and does not solicit contributions by mail.


POLICY CONCERNS

SECC advocates that state regulatory commissions deny rate increases to public utilities whose increased costs are due to excess capacity, especially from nuclear reactors. It argues that conservation measures and alternative fuels enabled the United States to weather the energy crises of the 1970s and that conservation techniques, cogeneration, and development of renewable energy can fill U.S. energy needs well into the twenty-first century.

In 1987, SECC argued against the reauthorization of the Price-Anderson Act, which relieves industry of much of the liability in the event of a nuclear accident. It argued that taxpayers will be asked to pay the cost instead, and relieving industry of liability reduces their incentive to operate safely. SECC also countered industry's assurances after the Chernobyl accident, stating that the containment system in use there was similar in principle to some American reactors, and

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