Press Freedom and Global Politics

By Douglas A. Van Belle | Go to book overview

1
Press Freedom and Global Politics

Few would assert that the issue of press freedom suffers from a lack of political attention or a lack of scholarly interest. Beginning with Pope Alexander VI in 1501 and for almost every moment of the nearly five centuries that have followed, leaders, from emperors to local school boards, have openly struggled to exert control over the product of the printing press and its mass communication descendants. The stakes in these struggles have always been extreme. Death penalties for unlicensed printing were instituted as early as 1535 ( Hocking, 1947), and the politically motivated imprisonment, abduction, and murder of journalists are still common events.

For the most part, efforts to defend press freedom have been equal to the task. In fact, if the gradual growth of press freedom around the world is any indicator, the defense and pursuit of press freedom might even be considered to be slightly more robust overall than the effort to censor. If you mark the beginning of the fight for press freedom with the arguments for unlicensed printing put forth in John Milton's Areopagitica, scholars, philosophers, and politicians have been fighting for the freedom to publish free of government control for three and a half centuries. Further, it has not been a silent or quiet struggle. Many of the more prominent names who have fought to defend or extend the freedom of the press, such as Thomas Jefferson, are synonymous with creation of the democratic foundations of the United States. The struggle continues

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Press Freedom and Global Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Press Freedom and Global Politics 1
  • Notes 8
  • 2 - Rational Foreign Policy Choice 9
  • Notes 24
  • 3 - The Press and Foreign Policy 25
  • Notes 44
  • 4 - Press Freedom and Militarized Disputes 47
  • Notes 73
  • 5 - Press Freedom and Lethal International Conflicts 77
  • Notes 93
  • 6 - A Monadic Effect for Press Freedom in Lethal International Conflicts 95
  • Notes 103
  • 7 - Press Freedom and Cooperation 105
  • Notes 127
  • 8 Conclusions 129
  • Appendix Measuring Global Press Freedom 137
  • Notes 148
  • Bibliography 149
  • Index 167
  • About the Author 171
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