Press Freedom and Global Politics

By Douglas A. Van Belle | Go to book overview

a dyad share this institutional feature and are able to exchange reliable information regarding unfolding events. The free press measures are so closely associated with the likelihood of conflict that the democracy score of the focal state, the more powerful state in each dyad, is never significant when one or more of the press freedom variables are also included in the specification. The effect of a free press on the probability of a dyadic dispute is substantively important as well. The likelihood of a dispute declines from .100 per year for a "typical" pair of contiguous states to .038 when both countries have independent presses.

In keeping with the contention that this can be considered as a refinement and extension of the work on the liberal, or democratic, peace it is clear that the results of this analysis could also be interpreted in terms of the norms-versus-structure debate within the literature on the democratic peace. The theoretical argument for including the press freedom measure in the analysis is basically a structural one. A free press matters because it enables the structural constraints in a liberal political regime to function more effectively in preventing international conflict. The interaction of free presses creates a decision-making context that raises the domestic political costs and decreases the leader's expectation of obtaining benefits from militarized conflict between free press countries. If the norms argument is correct, a free press is unnecessary because leaders should already be socialized against conflict in general and conflict with other democracies in particular. The statistical robustness of the free press measure as it is used in this analysis provides some reasonably strong support for the structuralist position although it clearly is not conclusive.


NOTES
1.
Gates et al. ( 1996) discount the role of Kant in developing the proposition for a peace between democracies. They argue that other philosophers of the Enlightenment, including Rousseau, Montesquieu, Paine, and Godwin, produced similar or more directly applicable arguments for a democratic peace.
2.
The cross-national freedom of the press data ( Van Belle, 1997) is available through the International Studies Association. It can be downloaded from the data set subdirectory of its Web site: http://csf. Colorado. EDU/isa.
3.
Similarly, when a simple cutoff of 6 on the Polity III democracy scale is used (see Gleditsch and Hegre, 1997, for an evaluation of this

-73-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Press Freedom and Global Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Press Freedom and Global Politics 1
  • Notes 8
  • 2 - Rational Foreign Policy Choice 9
  • Notes 24
  • 3 - The Press and Foreign Policy 25
  • Notes 44
  • 4 - Press Freedom and Militarized Disputes 47
  • Notes 73
  • 5 - Press Freedom and Lethal International Conflicts 77
  • Notes 93
  • 6 - A Monadic Effect for Press Freedom in Lethal International Conflicts 95
  • Notes 103
  • 7 - Press Freedom and Cooperation 105
  • Notes 127
  • 8 Conclusions 129
  • Appendix Measuring Global Press Freedom 137
  • Notes 148
  • Bibliography 149
  • Index 167
  • About the Author 171
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 176

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.