Press Freedom and Global Politics

By Douglas A. Van Belle | Go to book overview

CONCLUSION

It was expected that if there was a monadic relationship between press freedom and a reduced likelihood of casualties in disputes it would be modest, particularly in comparison to the clear effect of shared press freedom. It was hoped, however, that whatever the results were they would be clearer and easier to interpret. There is no real reason to expect that the components of the democracy measure would have different effects and any explanation offered here would be, at best, ad hoc. The best place to begin looking for an explanation might be to focus on the states with mixed regime attributes. The positive correlation for the democracy variable would be most influenced by the conflicts resulting in casualties where neither of the states involved had press freedom and one of the states had some degree of democracy in its political structures.


NOTES
1.
Given the diversity of voices in a free press regime, efforts to prevent dehumanization and lethal uses of force are almost always going to occur at some level. Without the active participation of political elites the news media's bias toward official and authoritative sources (see Cook, 1989) is likely to leave them marginalized and ineffective.
2.
Robust or Huberdized standard errors are used for data sets in which the cases are clustered together and there are concerns about the independence of cases, such as pooled time series analyses. If used here, they reduce the two-tailed test of significance to well below the .05 threshold (.076). However, the single-tailed test with robust standard errors is still above the .05 threshold (.039).

-103-

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Press Freedom and Global Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Press Freedom and Global Politics 1
  • Notes 8
  • 2 - Rational Foreign Policy Choice 9
  • Notes 24
  • 3 - The Press and Foreign Policy 25
  • Notes 44
  • 4 - Press Freedom and Militarized Disputes 47
  • Notes 73
  • 5 - Press Freedom and Lethal International Conflicts 77
  • Notes 93
  • 6 - A Monadic Effect for Press Freedom in Lethal International Conflicts 95
  • Notes 103
  • 7 - Press Freedom and Cooperation 105
  • Notes 127
  • 8 Conclusions 129
  • Appendix Measuring Global Press Freedom 137
  • Notes 148
  • Bibliography 149
  • Index 167
  • About the Author 171
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