Measurement of Love and Intimate Relations: Theories, Scales, and Applications for Love Development, Maintenance, and Dissolution

By Oliver C. S. Tzeng | Go to book overview

9
Summary and Applications

This book on the measurement of love was designed to serve as a reference guide for both research and clinical purposes. Research applications can include three broad domains: (1) development of new measures and assessment of existing scales, (2) evaluation and/or development of love theories, and (3) empirical research on social behaviors in relation to intimate relationships. Clinical applications can include two interrelated domains: (1) selection of measurement scales for assessing clients and also for monitoring the progress of clinical intervention and (2) adoption of a theoretical stand for addressing issues related to clinical practices (e.g., designing intervention goals, strategies, and evaluations for individuals at various stages of the love cycle).

For these purposes, this volume is divided into two general parts. Part I presents theoretical foundations in terms of the descriptions of two common (theoretical and methodological) frameworks for development and evaluation of theories and also the summary description of existing love theorizations organized under the eight octagonal stages. Part II presents measurement and empirical studies of love in terms of the descriptions of measurement strategies and 26 existing scales and also the illustration of three empirical research studies (with different procedures, strategies, and outcomes). These contents, presented in Chapters 1 through 8, are summarized here.


THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS

The scientific studies of love, though with a relatively short history, have been conducted from many disciplinary orientations. There exist significant conflicts, ambiguities, and uncertainties about the definitions, structures, and functions of love. Various scales developed for measuring love are thus

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