The Early Years of the Saturday Club, 1855-1870

By Edward Waldo Emerson | Go to book overview

PREFACE

ON the title-page of this book I appear as the author; the duty of preparing it was assigned to me by the Club, and I have worked for several years searching for and gathering material for this chronicle and building with it as best I might. But because of the eminence of the men who formed this happy company, and of those whom they chose to join them; also because, in those awakening and stirring times, they laboured, each in his own way, but sometimes combining, to serve, to free, and to elevate their Country, -- the story of the Club took on larger dimensions. Hence, to hasten the appearance of the book, I asked our associate Professor Bliss Perry to give his help. It has been most valuable. At his suggestion, four other members have written sketches for the book; Mr. Perry contributed nine, Mr. Storey two, Governor McCall one, Mr. DeWolfe Howe one, Mr. Edward W. Forbes one. Each is signed with the initials of the writer. To all of these my thanks are due for excellent help.

The original plan of the Club was to preserve a record of its first half-century of existence. By sanction of the Club only sixteen years of its history are here presented, but they tell of its Golden Age.

To the families or representatives of deceased members whose biographies, journals, or poems are quoted, the thanks of the Saturday Club are here rendered. If, by inadvertence, there has been failure to ask leave of these, the entire good-will of those whom I have approached makes us sure of their approval.

The publishing houses have all shown us courtesy and generosity. First should be gratefully acknowledged the debt owed to Messrs. Houghton Mifflin Company for their furtherance of this work by freest permission to quote largely from books published by them, memoirs or poems, or those containing anecdotes of our members. Messrs. Little, Brown and Company kindly let us freely quote from "The Art Life of William Morris Hunt", by Miss Knowlton, and the "Memoir of Henry Lee", by Mr. John Torrey Morse, and to both of these authors we owe thanks. To Messrs. D. Appleton and Company

-v-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Early Years of the Saturday Club, 1855-1870
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Introductory xi
  • Chapter I - The Attraction 1
  • Chapter II - 1855-1856 The Saturday Club is Born Also the Magazine or Atlantic Club 11
  • Chapter III - 1856 21
  • Chapter IV - 1857 128
  • Chapter V - 1858 166
  • Chapter VI - 1859 197
  • Chapter VII - 1860 234
  • Chapter VIII - 1861 249
  • Chapter IX - 1862 287
  • Chapter X - 1863 309
  • Chapter XI - 1864 334
  • Chapter XII - 1865 392
  • Chapter XIII - 1866 407
  • Chapter XIV - 1867 428
  • Chapter XV - 1868 447
  • Chapter XVI - 1869 456
  • Chapter XVII - 1870 474
  • Index 503
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 515

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.