Women and the Death Penalty in the United States, 1900-1998

By Kathleen A. O'Shea | Go to book overview

3
Arizona: Gas/Lethal Injection

The state of Arizona has sentenced three women to death since 1900. One of these women, Eva Dugan, was executed, and there is one woman on death row in Arizona today.

Arizona resumed capital punishment in 1992, and twelve people have been executed in the state since then. Former Governor Fife Symington, convicted of criminal activity himself, proposed and signed into law some of the toughest, most effective criminal justice legislation in the United States. This included a new truth-in-sentencing provision that eliminates parole and mandates that every convict now serve no less that 85 percent of his/her sentence.

The state uses lethal injection to execute condemned inmates sentenced after November 15, 1992 and those sentenced before that date may choose either gas or lethal injection. In June 1998 Arizona held its first daytime execution. Douglas Gretzler was executed at 3:00 p.m. Under a new rule signed by Chief Justice Thomas Zlaket, an execution must take place during a 24-hour-period beginning at whatever time the Director of the Department of Corrections decides. So, for example, if the time is set for 3:00 p.m. the execution can take place anytime until 3:00 p.m. the following day.

A spokesman for the Arizona Department of Corrections reported everything went extremely well with Gretzler's execution saying, "Carrying out an execution in the daytime proved to be a success." Likewise, the state Assistant Attorney General said it was a huge success and much easier to do during regular business hours.

Two weeks prior to an actual execution, the Arizona Department of Corrections conducts a dry-run of the execution process including a "mock" execution using supplies and drugs which have expired. A medical training device is used to practice intravenous insertion. Debra Milke, the only woman

-51-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women and the Death Penalty in the United States, 1900-1998
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 410

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.