Women and the Death Penalty in the United States, 1900-1998

By Kathleen A. O'Shea | Go to book overview

11
Idaho: Lethal Injection/Firing Squad
The state of Idaho has sentenced two women to death since 1900. No women have been executed and there is one woman on death row in Idaho today. Idaho allows the death penalty as an option in cases of first-degree murder and aggravated kidnapping. The sentence is death by lethal injection or the firing squad.In 1994 Keith Eugene Wells dropped all his appeals and became the first person executed in Idaho in 35 years. He was sentenced to death in 1990 for the unprovoked beating deaths of two people. He told police he attacked the two people with a baseball bat because he "knew it was time for them to die. I was a predator on the prowl for prey," he said. Idaho's last execution before Wells was the hanging of Raymond Allen Snowden on October 18, 1957, for the murder/mutilation of a woman he picked up in a bar. That was before Idaho gave death row inmates the option of lethal injection. As Snowden's execution took place, inmates at the maximum-security prison pounded on walls, shook cell doors, and stomped on floors in protest.Death-row inmates in Idaho are only allowed non-contact visits from their immediate family. They speak through telephones and face-to-face interviews are not allowed.For death by lethal injection, the state of Idaho employs a team to perform the execution. The team is responsible for inserting the IV line and administering the drugs. The sequence of drugs administered is:
5g. with dilutent of sodium pentothal
10 mg of Pavulon (generic name for pancuronium bromide)
2mEq/ml of potassium chloride

Each drug takes 45 seconds to administer and it takes 45 seconds for each saline flush after each drug is administered. The average length of time that

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