Women and the Death Penalty in the United States, 1900-1998

By Kathleen A. O'Shea | Go to book overview

16
Maryland: Gas/Lethal Injection

The state of Maryland has sentenced two women to death since 1900. No woman has been legally executed in Maryland, and there are no women on death row in Maryland today.

The history of the death penalty in Maryland is long. In fact, as a common law state, in keeping with the common laws of England Maryland has always had the death penalty as a punishment for murder. However, in 1809 the Maryland state legislature divided murder into varying degrees and decided on the death penalty as the punishment for first-degree murder only. This was sufficient until 1908 when the legislature again considered the question and decided to eliminate mandatory imposition of the death penalty for first-degree murder and give the seated judge at a murder trial the option of imposing the sentence of death or incarceration for life. Eight years later, in 1816, the legislature gave juries the power to return a verdict of guilty "without capital punishment" which, when used, would prevent a judge from imposing a sentence of death.

Until 1922 those found guilty of first degree murder and sentenced to death in Maryland were hanged, in the county where they were tried. In 1922 the state legislature decided that hangings were too much of a public spectacle and ordered executions to take place at the Maryland State Penitentiary. Between 1923 and 1961 there were eighty executions in the state of Maryland. Fifty- three were for murder and twenty-seven for rape. There were twelve double and two triple hangings.

The first indoor hanging was in the Baltimore City Jail in 1913. George Chelton was hanged inside the Maryland State Penitentiary on June 8, 1923. He was executed for rape. Hangings continued in Maryland until 1955 when the state legislature replaced that method of execution with the gas chamber.

-197-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women and the Death Penalty in the United States, 1900-1998
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 410

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.