Women and the Death Penalty in the United States, 1900-1998

By Kathleen A. O'Shea | Go to book overview

20
Nevada: Lethal Injection

The state of Nevada has sentenced two women to death since 1900, neither of these was executed and one woman is on death row in Nevada today.

In 1890, a woman, Elizabeth Potts was hanged with her husband on a double gallows in Elko, Nevada for murdering and dismembering Miles Faucett in Carlin, Nevada. Beginning in 1903, hangings were carried out at the Nevada state prison. Ten men were hanged between 1903 and 1912, including four in one day in 1905 using a double gallows. Then in 1913 the state of Nevada came up with a new execution device that was only used once to execute Andriza Mircovich. It was an automated firing squad that consisted of three rifles mounted on an iron frame that fired simultaneously.

In 1924 Nevada started using the gas chamber, and thirty-two men were executed by gas. Although Nevada now uses lethal injection, the old gas chamber at the Nevada state prison is still used as the execution room. Nevada has executed six inmates since the death penalty was reinstated in 1977. The latest execution, Richard Allen Moran, took place on March 30, 1996.


THE DEATH PENALTY IN NEVADA

As one of ten non-jury-sentencing states Nevada has a unique system for capital conviction. If the jury cannot unanimously find at least one aggravating circumstance, or cannot unanimously agree to a death sentence, the decision passes to a three-judge panel. The panel can only impose a death sentence if it unanimously finds at least one aggravating circumstance and unanimously agrees to impose a sentence of death. If these criteria cannot be met the sentence defaults to life in prison.

In Nevada when someone is sentenced to die, the first appeal is to the state Supreme Court. A second round of appeals to test the quality of legal

-233-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women and the Death Penalty in the United States, 1900-1998
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 410

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.