Women and the Death Penalty in the United States, 1900-1998

By Kathleen A. O'Shea | Go to book overview

Appendix B
Women with Death Sentences by State
Alabama
1930 Selena Gilmore executed
1953 Earle Dennison executed
1957 Rhonda Belle Martin executed
1978 Debra Bracewell reversed
1981 Patricia Thomas reversed
1983 Judith Neelley on death row
1988 Judie Haney life
1988 Altione Walker reversed
1989 Louise Harris on death row
1994 Lynda Lyon Block on death row
Arizona
1928 Eva Duggan executed
1933 Winnie Ruth Judd reversed
1991 Debra Jean Milke on death row
Arkansas
1984 Patricia Hendrickson reversed
1998 Christina Riggs on death row
California
1941 Ethel Juanita Spinelli executed
1947 Louise Peete executed
1955 Barbara Graham executed
1962 Elizabeth Ann Duncan executed
1970 Susan Denise Atkins life
1970 Leslie Van Houten life
1970 Patricia Krenwinkel life
1975 Mabel Glenn reversed
1989 Cynthia Coffman on death row

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