Aging, Health Behaviors, and Health Outcomes

By K. Warner Schaie; Dan Blazer et al. | Go to book overview

bility in research and policy to increase the degree to which lower socioeconomic strata experience similar postponement of morbidity and disability into the final years of the human life span.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This chapter was initially prepared for presentation at the Penn State Gerontology Center Conference on Aging, Health Behaviors, and Health Outcomes, Pennsylvania State University, October 23-24, 1989. A revised version was presented at Duke University on March 6, 1990 as part of the Duke University Council on Aging and Human Development Distinguished Faculty Lecture Series. The chapter integrates portions of two other papers ( House et al. 1990a and 1990b) and incorporates portions of the text and figures and tables of each. This work has been supported by the National Institute of Aging (Grant # PO1AG05561). We are indebted to Marie Klatt for preparing the manuscript, to Sue Meyer for preparing graphs, to the Technical Sections of the Survey Research Center for the conduct of the sampling, interviewing and coding of the Americans' Changing Lives Survey, and to other colleagues and respondents on the Americans' Changing Lives project for their assistance in various phases of the work. Ronald Abeles and David Featherman provided helpful comments on the initial version of this chapter and numerous other colleagues did likewise on the two papers that are integrated in this chapter.

The 1985 National Health Interview Survey data were made available by the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR). The data for the Health Interview Survey, 1985, were originally collected by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the National Center for Health Statistics. Neither the collector of the original data nor the Consortium bears any responsibility for the analyses or interpretations presented here.

The data computations upon which this chapter is based employed the OSIRIS IV computer software package, which was developed by the Institute for Social Research, The University of Michigan, using funds from the Survey Research Center, Inter-University Consortium for Political Research, National Science Foundation and other sources.


REFERENCES

Antonovsky A. ( 1967). "Social class, life expectancy, and overall mortality". Milbank Memorial Fund Quarterly, 45, 31-73.

Berkman L. F., & Breslow L. ( 1983). Health and ways of living: The Alameda County Study. London: Oxford University Press.

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