Aging, Health Behaviors, and Health Outcomes

By K. Warner Schaie; Dan Blazer et al. | Go to book overview

4
Living Arrangements and Problems With Daily Tasks for Older Women With Breast Cancer

William A. Satariano University of California

Nawal E. Ragheb Michigan State University


INTRODUCTION

Breast cancer is the leading form of cancer diagnosed in women ( Sondik, Young, Horm, & Ries, 1988). Once diagnosed, however, women with breast cancer have substantially better relative survival rates than those diagnosed with other leading forms of cancer, such as colon cancer and cancers of the lung and bronchus ( Sondik et al., 1987; Ries, Pollack, & Young, 1983). The large number of breast cancer cases diagnosed each year, plus the relatively favorable survival rates for treated patients, suggest that the quality of that survival is an important issue.

Quality of survival has been assessed in a variety of ways. In most cases, research has been devoted to psychosocial aspects of adjustment ( Taylor et al., 1985; Thomas, 1978). Less attention has been paid to more general areas of functioning, such as the degree of difficulty in completing physical tasks and the ease with which instrumental activities of daily living can be completed.

Instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), especially those dealing with tasks necessary to maintain independence in the home (housekeeping, grocery shopping and meal preparation) deserve special attention. IADL functioning is generally regarded as one of the standard methods of assessing the need for long-term care services ( Kane & Kane, 1987; Kavesh, 1986; Lawton, 1972). Those people who either cannot complete these activities themselves or have the activities completed for them are more likely to be subsequently institutionalized than are those who can meet these needs for themselves ( Branch, 1984; Branch & Jette, 1982). Each of the three instrumental activities corresponds directly to a specific type of home-care service. Thus, the measure

-101-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Aging, Health Behaviors, and Health Outcomes
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 198

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.