Self-Psychology and Diagnostic Assessment: Identifying Selfobject Functions through Psychological Testing

By Marshall L. Silverstein | Go to book overview

8
Mr. L.: Idealization and Twinship

A CASE OF ADMIXTURES OF SELFOBJECT FUNCTIONS

The second case that I present in its entirety is of interest for several reasons. This psychodiagnostic protocol has elements of the three major selfobject functions that Kohut identified, and therefore represents a typical clinical presentation of selfobject functions. Not a textbook case of clear idealization or twinship, it shows the difficulty in distinguishing these selfobject transferences from each other. The patient, Mr. L., alternated among selfobject functions to find a viable pathway for the repair of self-cohesion and like many other patients, attempted to establish a compensatory structure in the face of chronic mirroring selfobject failures.

Mr. L.'s case illustrates a point that Kohut came to see over time as his work progressed: Selfobject functions are not entirely independent of each other. With the possible exception of mirroring needs, which occur most often, other selfobject transferences predominate at different times. They come forward at some points and recede at others, often when an attempt at restoring self-esteem is either blocked or unsuccessful. Such vacillation is not an instance of inconsistency or failure to establish a predominant selfobject function; selfobject functions do not represent formes frustes. Admixtures frequently appear.

The case reported here is a good illustration of this clinical situation. I discuss it by considering all three selfobject functions and emphasize idealization and twinship as efforts to repair self-cohesion when mirroring has become unavailable or unsuccessful. The patient showed a degree of overt psychopathology comparable to Ms. T.; the degree of symptomatic disturbance is approximately equal in the two cases. Mr. L., however, had a more favorable premorbid adjustment. His disorder was more reactive and less chronic than the characterologically entrenched pathology of Ms. T.'s disorder.

-223-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Self-Psychology and Diagnostic Assessment: Identifying Selfobject Functions through Psychological Testing
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 298

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.