Inclusive Schooling: National and International Perspectives

By Stanley J. Vitello; Dennis E. Mithaug | Go to book overview

more efficient contact among different authorities in the central agency as well as in the field nationwide.

The main intention of the Swedish national center is to secure children, youth, and adults with disabilities an education comparable to that received by their nondisabled peers. This goal may be attained by offering municipalities and parents appropriate services and products. Twenty-three locations are erected throughout the country to contact and communication with those in need of information and support.

No doubt, such a network of professionals, together with available differentiated information, teaching aids, and so on will, in different ways, have a positive effect on serious endeavors for inclusion implementation. Moreover, the often emphasized requirement for a reliable follow-up on objectives and their reforms may be more efficient through a network like this. So even in this respect the Swedes seem to possess an instrument that neighbor researchers and politicians may want at their own disposal. This raises questions regarding how the process of inclusion implementation and its progress might be described and evaluated more accurately and effectively.


REFERENCES

The Swedish Public School System and Disabled Students. ( 1995, p.2). Harnosand, Sweden: National Agency for Special Education.

Tetler S. ( 1997, March). Group Inclusion--as a Stepping Stone to Full Inclusion. Paper presented at AERA 1997 annual meeting.

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