The Gladstone Diaries - Vol. 12

By H. C. G. Matthew | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION
On this great [Easter] day what are my special prayers? They are three.
For the speedy concession to Ireland of what she most justly desires.
That the concession may be so timed and shaped as to be entirely severed from all temptation to self-glorifying so far as I am concerned.
That thereafter the tie between me and the contentious life may at once be snapped. But now one prayer absorbs all others: Ireland, Ireland, Ireland.1

This has been a period of inner education, and disclosure of special wants: the spirit of faith: the spirit of prayer: the spirit of dependence: the spirit of manhood: the spirit of love. The weight on me is great and presses at many points: but how trifling when compared with the trials of great Christians.2

Eighty three birthdays! What responsibilities have old men as such for prolonged and multiplied opportunity. And what have I, as among old men. What openings, what cares, what blessings, and what sins.3


I

The seventh decade of Gladstone's public life was dominated, as had been most of the others, by Ireland. In the age of industrialism, the British had expected that class--whether the middle or the working class--would disrupt the political system. But it was the national question, not the class question, which the British political establishment failed to solve. In 1886, Gladstone had offered a bold answer, an answer which recognized national distinctiveness and at the same time pacified it within the Union. His answer was rejected by the Commons in 1886--a decision on the whole confirmed by the electorate later that year--and by the Lords in 1893. None the less, it was an answer so compelling that it was eventually adopted by the Unionists--too little, too late--in 1921, and it provided the framework within which all subsequent legislative attempts at modification of the constitution of the United Kingdom at the Parliamentary level have been made. Over a century later, and with six governmental Home Rule initiatives having failed (with the ironic exception of their implementation by the Unionists in Ulster), Gladstone's proposals of 1886 still hold the field as the means of constitutional reorganization of the United Kingdom. If there was to be constitutional change, it would be by some form of devolved Home Rule: Chamberlain's federal alternative has never, as yet, received serious consideration by a British Cabinet.

Gladstone sensed in 1886 that he had taken the first step down what was to

____________________
1
10 Apr. 87; references to the diary text are in this form.
2
9 Aug. 92.
3
29 Dec. 92.

-xxv-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Gladstone Diaries - Vol. 12
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • List of Illustrations x
  • ABBREVIATED CHRISTIAN AND SURNAMES xi
  • ABBREVIATED BOOK TITLES, MSS COLLECTIONS, ETC. xv
  • OTHER ABBREVIATIONS xx
  • Introduction xxv
  • Sat. Jan. 1. 1887 Circumcision [hawarden] 1
  • Frid. Ap. One. 1887 22
  • Sunday May One 87 Ss. Phil. & J. 30
  • Wed. June One 1887. 38
  • Wed. June One 1887. 54
  • Wed. June One 1887. 61
  • Wed. June One 1887. 81
  • Jan 1. S. & Circumcision 1888. [florence] 89
  • Frid. Mch One 1889. 176
  • Frid. Mch One 1889. 187
  • Frid. Mch One 1889. 193
  • Frid. Mch One 1889. 200
  • Frid. Mch One 1889. 208
  • Frid. Mch One 1889. 214
  • Frid. Mch One 1889. 221
  • Frid. Mch One 1889. 234
  • Frid. Mch One 1889. 241
  • Frid. Mch One 1889. 248
  • Circumcision Wed. Jan 1. 90. 260
  • Tues. Ap. One. 1890. 282
  • Tues. Ap. One. 1890. 305
  • Tues. Ap. One. 1890. 312
  • Tues. Ap. One. 1890. 318
  • Tues. Ap. One. 1890. 325
  • Tues. Ap. One. 1890. 332
  • Tues. Ap. One. 1890. 344
  • Thurs. Circumcision Jan. 1. 91. 356
  • Sexa S. Feb. One 1891. 362
  • Sexa S. Feb. One 1891. 370
  • Wed Ap. One 1891. 377
  • Frid. May 1 Ss Phil. & J. 382
  • Frid. May 1 Ss Phil. & J. 387
  • Frid. May 1 Ss Phil. & J. 398
  • Frid. May 1 Ss Phil. & J. 404
  • Frid. May 1 Ss Phil. & J. 410
  • Frid. May 1 Ss Phil. & J. 416
  • Frid. May 1 Ss Phil. & J. 422
  • APPENDIX Gladstone's Letters to Laura Thistlethwayte, 1870-1893 431
  • WHERE WAS HE? 1887-1891 533
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 538

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.