Protestants First: Orangeism in Nineteenth Century Scotland

By E. W. McFarland | Go to book overview

around those conservative and radical elements of theology, between Lutheran piety and respect for authority and the neo-Calvinist conception of lawful resistance to tyranny. Finally, one should also note the more basic potential for disjuncture between Orangeism's structure and ideology. If, for example, in any particular period Orangeism had organisationally assumed a markedly hierarchical and authoritarian form, this is no reason to rule out a priori the existence of an ideology capable even of a measure of militant populism. This was actually the case in Belfast in the early twentieth century, and is a point neglected in Gibbon's inference that the lodges, 'because of their partly Masonic character... and their ideological fusion with church and chapel structure, their politics and values were in no sense open to democratic contestation.' 50


NOTES
1.
R Sibbet, Orangeism in Ireland and Throughout the Empire ( 1939), Chapter xxiv.
2.
See Knoop and Jones, A Short History of Freemasonry ( 1940).
3.
See Glasgow News (GN), 20/12/ 1873; 23/9/ 75); 18/12/ 75); 22/12/ 77) for some examples of the latter's meetings. The September 1875 meeting was to commemorate the battle of the Diamond, 21st September, 1795.
4.
George McLeod was MWGM for five years and C. I. Paton served from 1874 till his death in 1889.
5.
For a very early example see The Orange Institution, A Slight Sketch, a promotional pamphlet of 1813 -- actually containing recruitment advertisements. It describes the order of business: 1. Lodge to open with a prayer (members standing). 2. General Rules to be read. 3. Members proposed 4. Representations from committee. 5. Names of members called over. 6. Members balloted for. 7. Members made. 8. Lodge closed with prayer (members standing).

This can be compared with the Glasgow News' description of an ordinary lodge meeting in the 1870s, Campsie LOL No. 105 at the Tontine Hall, Glasgow, 'The lodge was opened in due form, a portion of scripture read, minutes of the last meeting read and approved by the secretary. The roll was called and well responded to, 3 new members initiated into the First Order and 3 admitted by certificate. Other business was gone through and the lodge closed in the usual manner', GN, 6/11/ 73).

T Gray in The Orange Order ( 1976) also cites the more elaborate breakdown in procedure set out in the 1897 "'Laws and Ordinances'" which he suggests remains substantially similar today.

1. The Chair is taken. 2. The Deputy chair taken. 3. A Tyler (doorman) is appointed. 4. A steward is appointed. 5. Opening prayer is read (brethren standing). 6. Scripture reading. 7. Minutes. *8. General Qualifications read. 9. Preliminary correspondence. 10. Dues. 11. Appeals relating to elections. 12. Election of officers (where applicable). 13. Other correspondence. 14. Business arising. *15. Election of candidates. 16. Admission of candidates. †17. Appeals. †18. Reports from inferior lodges. 19. General Business. †20. Names of candidates for next meeting. 21. Closing prayer.

-14-

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Protestants First: Orangeism in Nineteenth Century Scotland
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Key to Abbreviations vi
  • Preface vii
  • 1 - What is Orangeism? 1
  • Notes 14
  • 2 - Theoretical Approaches 17
  • Notes 28
  • 3 - Historical Overview: 'the Lodge of Diamond in Armagh' 30
  • Notes 45
  • 4: The early History of Orangeism in Scotland 1799-1865 47
  • 5 - Orangeism in Scotland 1865-1900: Quantification and Class Composition 70
  • Notes 91
  • 6 - Absolute Strength and Relative Weakness 95
  • 7 - The Scottish Churches 115
  • Notes 136
  • 8 - Leadership and Rank and File Relations 139
  • Notes 157
  • 9 - The Mainspring of Conservatism? 1865-85 160
  • Notes 186
  • 10 - Truckling to Popery (1886-1900) 190
  • Notes 209
  • Postscript Orangeism in Modern Scotland 212
  • Notes 219
  • Appendix A District Lodges' Numbers and Locations c. 1878 220
  • Appendix B Greenock Orangemen: Occupational Breakdown 1879-86 221
  • Appendix C Greenock Orangemen: Occupational Breakdown 1892 223
  • Appendix D Paisley Orangemen: Occupational Breakdown 1866-86 225
  • Appendix E Biographical Index 227
  • Appendix F Clergymen with Orange Links 1865-1900 233
  • Bibliography 235
  • Index 250
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