Protestants First: Orangeism in Nineteenth Century Scotland

By E. W. McFarland | Go to book overview

Thirdly, the absolute strength of the Orangeism will be examined and also its relative weakness in comparison with Ulster and other major Orange importations in Canada and Liverpool. Not only are these important historical points, but the latter also lays stress on the unfortunate interaction between certain intrinsic characteristics of the LOI as an ' Ulster body', with the cultural and political, as well as major economic features of Scottish society.

Finally, and perhaps most important, for any new approach to working class sectionalism, one must concur with Penn on the need for 'a phenomenological input into class analysis'. 22 Penn has in mind here the battle for skill in the workshop, but sensitivity to meanings and self perceptions seems also indispensable in understanding both the attraction of the Institution to the average Orangeman and the internal tensions which beset it, with its attempts to achieve 'respectable' status in Scotland.


NOTES
1.
Roberts, op. cit. ( 1971), pp. 269-283.
2.
N Belton, "'Ireland -- Unravelling the Knot'", Bulletin of Scottish Politics, No. 2 ( 1981), for example, points to the 'utopian function' Ireland has performed for the British left -- the Irish threatening 'an apocalyptic alternative: insurgent republicans attacking the heart of the physical power of the British state on the one hand; ugly, overtly reactionary Protestants led by a seemingly mad demagogue on the other', p. 188.
3.
"'North East Ulster'" in Ireland on the Dissecting Table, Connolly on Ulster, Cork Workers Club ( 1975). For a later Connolly approach, 'Forward', 3/5/ 1913.
4.
L de Paor, Divided Ulster, ( 1971), p. 61.
5.
M Farrel, The Orange State, ( 1976), p. 81.
6.
H Patterson, Class Conflict and Sectarianism ( 1981). For a succinct account of the phenomenon, see also Belton review in Bulletin of Scottish Politics, No. 2, 1981, pp. 188-192.
7.
The Rousing of the Scottish Working Class ( 1979), p. 80, Capital and Class in Scotland ( 1982), p. 25.
8.
Patterson, op. cit. ( 1981).
9.
See N Poulantzas, Political Power and Social Classes ( 1973).
10.
Patterson, op. cit. ( 1981), p. 85.
11.
For hegemony, see S Hall, "'Culture, Media and the Ideological Effect'", in Mass Communications on Society, J Curran (ed.) ( 1977), pp. 331-6.
12.
E Laclau and C Mouffe, Hegemony and Socialist Strategy: Towards a Radical Democratic Strategy ( 1985).
13.
Marxism Today, October 1978, Judith Bloomfield "'A Discussion of Marxist Writing on Class'", pp. 328-332.
14.
Commonsense and Working Class Consciousness: Some Aspects of Glasgow and Liverpool Labour Movements in the early years of the 20th century, Ph.D. thesis, University of Edinburgh 1984.
16.
R Penn, Skilled Workers in the Class Structure ( 1985).
17.
Ibid. See particularly Chapter 8.

-28-

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Protestants First: Orangeism in Nineteenth Century Scotland
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Key to Abbreviations vi
  • Preface vii
  • 1 - What is Orangeism? 1
  • Notes 14
  • 2 - Theoretical Approaches 17
  • Notes 28
  • 3 - Historical Overview: 'the Lodge of Diamond in Armagh' 30
  • Notes 45
  • 4: The early History of Orangeism in Scotland 1799-1865 47
  • 5 - Orangeism in Scotland 1865-1900: Quantification and Class Composition 70
  • Notes 91
  • 6 - Absolute Strength and Relative Weakness 95
  • 7 - The Scottish Churches 115
  • Notes 136
  • 8 - Leadership and Rank and File Relations 139
  • Notes 157
  • 9 - The Mainspring of Conservatism? 1865-85 160
  • Notes 186
  • 10 - Truckling to Popery (1886-1900) 190
  • Notes 209
  • Postscript Orangeism in Modern Scotland 212
  • Notes 219
  • Appendix A District Lodges' Numbers and Locations c. 1878 220
  • Appendix B Greenock Orangemen: Occupational Breakdown 1879-86 221
  • Appendix C Greenock Orangemen: Occupational Breakdown 1892 223
  • Appendix D Paisley Orangemen: Occupational Breakdown 1866-86 225
  • Appendix E Biographical Index 227
  • Appendix F Clergymen with Orange Links 1865-1900 233
  • Bibliography 235
  • Index 250
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