Protestants First: Orangeism in Nineteenth Century Scotland

By E. W. McFarland | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
Advocated by Poulantzas, op. cit. ( 1975), pp. 11-33.
2.
Cleary, op. cit. ( 1897), p.5.
3.
In Sibbet Orangeism in Ireland and throughout the Empire ( 1939) no less than the first 14 chapters of the first volume are taken up with an extremely detailed narrative of the Williamite campaigns. Similarly in a more recent official history, M W Dewar et al, Orangeism: a New Historical Appreciation ( 1967) the first 80 pages cover the same topic. 'Remember 1690', states the prologue, 'is not the motto of a historical cult but reminds Ulster Protestants of present threats to their security.
4.
H Senior, Orangeism in Ireland in Britain 1795-1836 ( 1966).
5.
In Dewar, et al op. cit. ( 1967), p. 101.
6.
See R Miles, Racism and Migrant Labour ( 1982), Chapter 6 for a useful summary.
7.
Cleary, op. cit. ( 1897), p.52.
8.
The event is celebrated in the usual Orange literary style,

'There Blacker, Sloan and Aitken's sons stood true unto the core,
With Sinclair and Dan Winter too, and Verner evermore,
These were the sons that led the van and did true valour show,
At the Battle of the Diamond, boys, a hundred years ago'.

In Dewar, op. cit. ( 1967), p.85.

9.
Killen, Ecclesiastical History of Ireland, vol. ii, p.359.
10.
Cleary wishes to use Peep o' Day Boys and Orangemen interchangably. Sibbet's disclaimer of any link is modified even in Dewar, and some overlapping membership seems logical.
11.
Cleary, op. cit. ( 1897), p.36.
12.
Chambers Encyclopedia Ed. 1865, "'Orangeism'" article.
13.
B Probert, Beyond Orange and Green ( 1978), p.26.
14.
P. Gibbon, The Origins of Ulster Unionism ( 1976), p.32.
15.
Probert, op. cit. ( 1978), p.36.
16.
Gibbon, op. cit. ( 1976), p.32.
17.
Sibbet, op. cit., vol. 2 ( 1939), p.289.
18.
The '98 victory is again celebrated in song.

'Poor croppies ye knew that your sentence was come,
When you heard the dread sound of the Protestant drum.
In memory of William we hoisted our flag,
And so,on the bright Orange put down the green rag.
Down, down, croppies, lie down.'

Dewar, et al op. cit. ( 1967). p.111.

19.
Senior, op. cit. ( 1966), Chapter 5.
20.
Ibid, for a detailed account. Scarlet and Black degrees had been added as further 'inner circles'. The gentry could not see their relevance.
21.
Ibid, Chapter 7.
22.
For Liverpool Orangeism's early history, see Waller, Democracy and Sectarianism: a Political and Social History of Liverpool 1868-1939 ( 1981).
23.
Ibid, Chapter 1.
24.
For the early history of the English Lodges, see Cassirer, The Irish Influence on the Liberal Movement in England 1798-1832, Ph.D., London, 1938.
25.
Cleary, op. cit. ( 1897), p.4.
26.
H Senior, Orangeism: the Canadian Phase, nd.

-45-

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Protestants First: Orangeism in Nineteenth Century Scotland
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Key to Abbreviations vi
  • Preface vii
  • 1 - What is Orangeism? 1
  • Notes 14
  • 2 - Theoretical Approaches 17
  • Notes 28
  • 3 - Historical Overview: 'the Lodge of Diamond in Armagh' 30
  • Notes 45
  • 4: The early History of Orangeism in Scotland 1799-1865 47
  • 5 - Orangeism in Scotland 1865-1900: Quantification and Class Composition 70
  • Notes 91
  • 6 - Absolute Strength and Relative Weakness 95
  • 7 - The Scottish Churches 115
  • Notes 136
  • 8 - Leadership and Rank and File Relations 139
  • Notes 157
  • 9 - The Mainspring of Conservatism? 1865-85 160
  • Notes 186
  • 10 - Truckling to Popery (1886-1900) 190
  • Notes 209
  • Postscript Orangeism in Modern Scotland 212
  • Notes 219
  • Appendix A District Lodges' Numbers and Locations c. 1878 220
  • Appendix B Greenock Orangemen: Occupational Breakdown 1879-86 221
  • Appendix C Greenock Orangemen: Occupational Breakdown 1892 223
  • Appendix D Paisley Orangemen: Occupational Breakdown 1866-86 225
  • Appendix E Biographical Index 227
  • Appendix F Clergymen with Orange Links 1865-1900 233
  • Bibliography 235
  • Index 250
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