Protestants First: Orangeism in Nineteenth Century Scotland

By E. W. McFarland | Go to book overview

and Greenock, already examined, present very similar patterns. In Paisley, with the exception of District Master A R Pollock in the Philosophical Society, no names were identified in other Paisley societies, benevolent, trade and religious. Nor contrary to current popular assumptions, were Orangemen found among any of the officebearers of the town's masonic lodges, Renfrew County, 'Kilwinning' Lodge or Paisley 'St. Mirren'. 98 In Greenock only the most peripheral involvement was found in benevolent, temperance and sporting clubs, with one William Swan, an Orangeman, being described as 'key keeper' in the Weavers' Society. Again there is no representation apparent in the lodges of Freemasonry, Kilwinning No. 12, St. John No. 175 and the Royal Arch Chapter No. 17, nor in the town's main religious societies, the Greenock United Bible Society and Association, or the YMCA and the Working Boys' and Girls' Religious Society. The one exception here with some Orange participation, although by no means a domination in its committee, is the Greenock Young Men's Protestant Association instituted in 1862. This has a constitution which reads like an extension of the order's own, its object: the study of the Bible and Romish works, enlightenment of Protestants as to the real character of Popery in its religious, social and political aspects, and the conversion of Romanists. 99


NOTES
1.
See Dickson, op. cit. (1980).
2.
Cloughly BWN, 23/11/1929.
3.
In 1873 for example when a major demonstration was held at Glasgow contingents from Paisley, Govan, Greenock, Port Glasgow, Lanarkshire, West Lothian, Edinburgh and the East to be organized and conveyed GH 16/7/73, or GH 13/7/76 for Kilmarnock demonstration.
4.
Forward, 12/7/1913, "'July the Twelfth'".
5.
GH, 13/7/72. There are, of course, difficulties of precise quantification with all these figures. In this respect official Orange accounts of turnout tend often to be wildly exaggerated, including wives and friends of the brethren, though those prepared by the LOI for the railway companies involved (in the interests of expense) are probably more reliable though still over the mark. If these are taken in conjunction with eyewitness reports culled from a collection of contemporary newspapers of various political and religious hues, from the Glasgow News (Tory) to the Glasgow Observer (Roman Catholic) then some estimate, albeit imperfect, is possible.
6.
GH, 16/7/73.
7.
GH, 13/7/84.
8.
GH and Glasgow News (GN), e.g. 13/7/74 Broomhouse; 13/7/75 Dumbarton; 14/7/78 Rutherglen; 13/7/80 Hawkhill; 13/7/81 Johnstone; 13/7/82 Maryhill; 13/7/82 Coatbridge; 13/8/87 Paisley.
9.
GN, 13/7/75.
10.
GN, 13/7/78.

-91-

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Protestants First: Orangeism in Nineteenth Century Scotland
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Key to Abbreviations vi
  • Preface vii
  • 1 - What is Orangeism? 1
  • Notes 14
  • 2 - Theoretical Approaches 17
  • Notes 28
  • 3 - Historical Overview: 'the Lodge of Diamond in Armagh' 30
  • Notes 45
  • 4: The early History of Orangeism in Scotland 1799-1865 47
  • 5 - Orangeism in Scotland 1865-1900: Quantification and Class Composition 70
  • Notes 91
  • 6 - Absolute Strength and Relative Weakness 95
  • 7 - The Scottish Churches 115
  • Notes 136
  • 8 - Leadership and Rank and File Relations 139
  • Notes 157
  • 9 - The Mainspring of Conservatism? 1865-85 160
  • Notes 186
  • 10 - Truckling to Popery (1886-1900) 190
  • Notes 209
  • Postscript Orangeism in Modern Scotland 212
  • Notes 219
  • Appendix A District Lodges' Numbers and Locations c. 1878 220
  • Appendix B Greenock Orangemen: Occupational Breakdown 1879-86 221
  • Appendix C Greenock Orangemen: Occupational Breakdown 1892 223
  • Appendix D Paisley Orangemen: Occupational Breakdown 1866-86 225
  • Appendix E Biographical Index 227
  • Appendix F Clergymen with Orange Links 1865-1900 233
  • Bibliography 235
  • Index 250
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