Constitutional Development in Alabama, 1798-1901: A Study in Politics, the Negro, and Sectionalism

By Malcolm Cook McMillan | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
THE MISSISSIPPI TERRITORIAL STAGE

The Mississippi Territory, as originally created by act of Congress in 1798, included all the territory now in Alabama and Mississippi north of 31§ and south of 32§ 28þ. After Spain withdrew from this area under the terms of the Treaty of 1795, Congress hastened to organize the territory in order to assert the sovereignty of the United States. In 1804, following Georgia's cession of her western lands to the federal government, the territory was increased by the addition of that area now in Alabama and Mississippi north of 32§ 28'. This more than doubled the size of the territory. In 1812, when Congress added the Mobile district of West Florida, the limits of the territory reached completion.

The act creating the Mississippi Territory in 1798 directed the President of the United States to establish therein a "government in all respects similar to that now exercised in the Territory northwest of the Ohio," excepting the clauses forbidding slavery.1 In a very real sense the Northwest Ordinance served as a constitution for the Mississippi, Alabama, and all other territories of the United States. Its bill of rights, framework of government, and stages of territorial development became integral parts of the government of every territory organized after its passage in 1787. The government was to be carried on by a governor, a secretary, and three judges appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate. Whenever the district had five thousand male inhabitants, the landowners could choose a House of Representatives. The House of Representatives would nominate ten men from whom the President would choose five to act as a legislative council.2 Modeled to a great extent on the British system of the colonial period, the Ordinance nevertheless made improvements in that system. A territorial delegate (the colonial agent of the British period) was given a seat in Congress al-

____________________
1
U. S. Statutes at Large, I, 549-550. In the House of Representatives, George Thatcher of Massachusetts moved to exclude slavery from the Mississippi Territory, but only twelve representatives voted for exclusion. See Annals of Congress, 5 Cong., 1 sess., 1306-1312.
2
In August, 1789, Congress passed an act to make the Northwest Ordinance congruent with the Constitution. The law authorized the President with the consent of the Senate to appoint all the territorial officers which "Congress assembled" was given power to appoint in the original act. The President was also given power to remove these officials with the exception of the judges. The act further provided that in the absence of the governor the secretary would become acting governor of the territory. U. S. Statutes at Large, I, 50-53.

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Constitutional Development in Alabama, 1798-1901: A Study in Politics, the Negro, and Sectionalism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 412

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.