The Formulation and Administration of United States Foreign Policy

By H. Field Haviland; Robert E. Asher et al. | Go to book overview
CONTENTS
Page
PrefaceV
Letter of transmittalIX
I. Summary of conclusions and recommendations1
A. Future requirements of policymaking and administration1
B. The Congress2
C. Executive leadership3
D. Political, economic, and information affairs4
E. Relationship with the Military Establishment5
F. Intelligence, planning, and execution6
G. Field missions7
H. Personnel management8
II. Body of the report11
Chapter I. Future requirements for policymaking and administration11
A. American objectives in world affairs11
B. Prospective world environment12
C. United States position and capabilities16
D. Possibilities and limitations of organizational adjustment18
E. Special requirements for administering future foreign policy20
Chapter II. The Congress22
A. Relations with the executive branch22
B. Organization of the Congress28
C. Summary: A basic issue38
Chapter III. Executive leadership40
A. The nature of the administrative load40
B. Adjustment to the load-cycles and dilemmas41
C. The role of executive assistance43
D. Possible changes in executive assistance46
Chapter IV. Political, economic, and information affairs57
A. Political affairs57
B. Economic affairs61
C. Overseas information and cultural exchange72
Chapter V. Relationship with the Military Establishment80
A. Military organization in relation to foreign policy81
B. Relations between the Military Establishment and civilian foreign policy agencies85
C. Internal military organization in relation to foreign policy88
Chapter VI. Intelligence, planning, and execution92
A. Intelligence92
B. The planning function97
C. Execution and evaluation105
Chapter VII. Field missions110
A. Role and selection of Ambassadors110
B. Supporting organization for the Ambassador112
C. Relations with multilateral organizations116
Chapter VIII. Personnel management121
A. Background121
B. A single foreign service123
C. Legislative authority for operating agency career services125
D. Balance between generalists and specialists127
E. Recruitment132
F. Inservice training134
G. Imrovement of career management137

-III-

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