The Formulation and Administration of United States Foreign Policy

By H. Field Haviland; Robert E. Asher et al. | Go to book overview

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

THE BROOKINGS INSTITUTION, Washington, D.C., November 9, 1959.

Hon. J. WILLIAM FULBRIGHT, Chairman, Committee on Foreign Relations, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C.

DEAR SENATOR FULBRIGHT: I am pleased to transmit herewith a report on "The Formulation and Administration of United States Foreign Policy," which has been prepared for the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations pursuant to Senate Resolution 336, approved July 31, 1958. In accepting the invitation of the committee to undertake this study, it was agreed that the report would focus more on an exploration of broad, long-range problems than on a detailed survey of existing administrative arrangements.

This study is based on an appraisal of the evolving ends and means of U.S. foreign policy in relation to changing world conditions. The appraisal indicates the range of problems that the organizational structure and administrative procedures should be prepared to meet. It provides the perspective for dealing more specifically with the administrative tasks to be performed, the major difficulties that seem to stand in the way, and the improvements that appear to be needed. These are analyzed in the main portion of the study, which covers the organization and procedures in the Congress and the executive branch, with special reference to the principal elements on which attention should be concentrated in the future. Some important aspects of the role of multilateral organizations in the conduct of U.S. foreign policy and of the organizational arrangements for U.S. relations with Latin America, which were originally planned by the Senate committee as separate studies, are also analyzed in this report.

Because of the time and budgetary limitations that were imposed on this study, an exhaustive analysis could not be made of all aspects of the subject. These limitations also made it necessary to make maximum use of work that had already been done, and of the experience and knowledge of those both inside and outside the Government who are intimately acquainted with the processes for the formulation and administration of U.S. foreign policy.

Previous studies by The Brookings Institution have provided useful background for the present report. On several occasions since the Second World War, special reports have been prepared for the Congress or the executive branch on particular problems concerning the administration of American foreign affairs. Other studies of the subject have also been of great assistance. Some of these have been prepared by committees and commissions of the Congress, others by various agencies of the executive branch, and still others by private organizations and individuals. It is not possible to list and acknowledge here all the specific sources that have been consulted, but several of them are cited at relevant points in the report.

-IX-

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