The Formulation and Administration of United States Foreign Policy

By H. Field Haviland; Robert E. Asher et al. | Go to book overview

The Brookings staff members and consultants responsible for the present study have sought, by means of interviews with officials in the Government and on the basis of materials supplied by them, to obtain insights into the current administration of foreign policy. More than 300 persons were interviewed, and they were most helpful in sharing the results of their experience and in suggesting the kinds of changes they thought might be needed in the future. The institution has had the wholehearted cooperation of the Members of Congress and the congressional committee staffs, and the several executive departments, agencies, and officials concerned. It acknowledges with gratitude their great assistance.

The study was directed by H. Field Haviland, Jr., who is primarily responsible for the interpretations, conclusions and recommendations in, and the final drafting of, this report. Other Brookings staff members who contributed to it are: Robert E. Asher, Maynard B. Barnes, and Charles A. H. Thomson. The following, who were retained as consultants or special staff members, also made substantial contributions to the report: Harrison Brown, professor of geochemistry, California Institute of Technology; Holbert N. Carroll, professor of political science, University of Pittsburgh; Robert E. Elder, professor of political science, Colgate University; Edward L. Katzenbach, Jr., director of academic development, Brandeis University; John Lindeman, International Economic Consultants of Washington; Charlton Ogburn, Jr., private consultant and author; William Reitzel, professor of political science, Haverford College; and Burton M. Sapin, assistant professor of political science, Vanderbilt University. The study was made under the general supervision of Robert W. Hartley, director of international studies, and George A. Graham, director of governmental studies.

In the preparation of this report, the staff and consultants have had the benefit of consultations with an advisory committee consisting of: Robert R. Bowie, director, Center for International Affairs, Harvard University; Harlan Cleveland, dean, Maxwell Graduate School of Citizenship and Public Affairs; Caryl P. Haskins, president, Carnegie Institution of Washington; Evron M. Kirkpatrick, executive director, American Political Science Association; Klaus E. Knorr, associate director, Center of International Studies, Princeton University; Max F. Milliken, director, Center for International Studies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Paul H. Nitze, president, Foreign Service Educational Foundation; James A. Perkins, vice president, Carnegie Corp. of New York; Brig. Gen. Thomas R. Phillips ( U.S. Army retired), military correspondent, St. Louis Post-Dispatch; Charles B. Stauffacher, executive vice president, Continental Can Co., Inc.; Harold Stein, professor, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Leroy D. Stinebower, executive assistant to the chairman, Standard Oil Co. ( New Jersey); and Donald C. Stone, dean, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, University of Pittsburgh. The institution is heavily indebted to this group for their many helpful suggestions.

Finally, it must be noted that in making a report of this kind, the institution presents it as a competent treatment of the subject that is worthy of public consideration. Interpretations, however, are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the other

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