The Formulation and Administration of United States Foreign Policy

By H. Field Haviland; Robert E. Asher et al. | Go to book overview

THE FORMULATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF UNITED STATES FOREIGN POLICY

I. SUMMARY OF CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

A. FUTURE REQUIREMENTS OF POLICYMAKING AND AND ADMINISTRATION

1. The organization and procedures for the formulation and administration of U.S. foreign policy should be adjusted to meet new requirements. These requirements are determined by the objectives of the American people in world affairs, the prospective world environment in which they must live, and their capabilities for attaining their objectives.

2. In the years ahead, attainment of the broad American objective of a peaceful and prosperous world order, in which the United States can be free and safe, promises to be no easier than it has been in the recent past. International communism, with its hard core of Soviet Russian and Communist Chinese power, must be expected to remain a continuing threat. Even if the cold war should ease, there are many other sources of continuing tensions.

3. Forces generated by further scientific and technological advances, particularly in the development of weapons, by the rapid growth and changing distribution of world population, by the constant pressure for improved levels of living in the underdeveloped areas, and by the rise of new nations, will tend to produce a changing and unstable international situation.

4. Within this prospective world environment, there are likely to be shifts in the relative power position of the United States. Still the United States has great capabilities for maintaining a strong position. Full realization of them depends, however, on a more systematic mobilization of human and material resources behind national policy and improved collaboration between the United States and other nations whose peoples have goals similar to or compatible with American objectives in world affairs.

5. To make the most of American capabilities, heavy responsibilities must be borne by the U.S. Government. The contribution of governmental organization and procedures will be to mobilize people, ideas, and resources in ways that will make optimum use of their potential. Organization will not be a neutral factor in, but an. active determinant of, the successful conduct of U.S. foreign relations. It cannot, however, be a substitute for competent people and sound policies.

6. Future governmental organization and procedures for administering foreign policy must provide for: increased orientation of

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