The Formulation and Administration of United States Foreign Policy

By H. Field Haviland; Robert E. Asher et al. | Go to book overview

II. BODY OF THE REPORT

Chapter I. Future Requirements for Policymaking and Administration

In recent decades, the United States has come to occupy a position of preeminent leadership in world affairs. To support this position, American military, economic, and political power has had to be marshalled on a scale unprecedented in American history. This has required, in turn, far-reaching changes in the organization of the U.S. Government in order to administer effectively the vast array of functions and the huge expenditures now involved. New agencies have been established and old ones reorganized in the continuing effort to adapt the structure and processes of the Government to new American objectives in changing world conditions. But the problems continue to grow in scale and intricacy, while attitudes and institutions lag behind.

It is the purpose of this study to look ahead to see what future changes may be necessary in the structure and process of the U.S. Government to cope with the kinds of international conditions that are likely to prevail in the coming years. This analysis begins with some brief observations on U.S. objectives, certain prospective developments in the world environment, the position and capabilities of the United States, the possibilities and limitations of organizational adjustment, and certain administrative requirements that are implied by the assessment of future conditions. These requirements provide the basic yardsticks for reappraising the current foreign policy organization and suggesting possible improvements where they appear to be both desirable and feasible.


A. AMERICAN OBJECTIVES IN WORLD AFFAIRS

Stated in their broadest terms, the most immediate objectives of the United States in world affairs are to maintain the peace and security of the American people and to promote international conditions in which they may continue to improve their well-being. To further these broad objectives, the United States has since the Second World War actively sought the establishment of a world order in which all nations, large and small, could live in peace and security and under which their peoples could enjoy a growing measure of well-being.

Attainment of these objectives, however, promises to be no easier in the years ahead than in the past two decades. International communism, with its hard core of Soviet Russian and Communist Chinese power, with its vested interest in disorder and instability in the nonCommunist world, its heady new prestige in the fields of science and technology, and its determination to expand and dominate, will remain the most immediate threat. Whatever illusions some Americans may have held about the instability of the Soviet Russian re

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